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Developing Hospitality Talent By Raini Hamdi Developing Hospitality Talent Developing Hospitality Talent By Raini Hamdi 1 Developing Hospitality Talent 21 Bukit Batok Street 22 Singapore 659589 Telephone 65 6415 3588 Facsimile 65 6415 3530 Email marcom shatec.sg Website www.shatec.sg Project Team Margaret Heng Cheang Sai Ming Shrestha Sook Yean Copyright 2013. All rights reserved. Shatec Institutes Pte Ltd. No parts of this publication may be reproduced stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means electronic mechanical photocopying recording or otherwise without the prior permission of the copyright owner. Request for permission should be addressed to the Publisher Shatec Institutes 21 Bukit Batok Street 22. Singapore 659589 Telephone 65 6415 3588 Facsimile 65 6415 3530 Email marcom shatec.sg Design and print managed by TTG Asia Media Pte Ltd ISBN 9 8-981-0 - 025-9 2 Developing Hospitality Talent Contents FOREWORD 5 - Mdm Kay Kuok President of the Singapore Hotel Association - Mr Albert Teo Chairman SHATEC - Ms Raini Hamdi Author PART ONE The hotel industry A people builder July 2 1 983 PART FOUR Developing future hoteliers the journey continues 48 A problem time immemorial Millennials are from Mars 49 51 10 1 1 53 So you want to be a hotelier 54 Look ma a real rainbow 55 How the industry is changing PART FIVE 12 What drove the birth of SHATEC 13 Some things have not changed What it takes to build a hotel school The visionary Mr Pakir Money money money Timing and angel funders Love and affection Pakir Singh the father of Singapore s hospitality training 22 PART TWO Reach out and touch 15 58 Made in SHATEC 59 The Graduate And how they made it PART SIX 30 years 30 secret recipes of top chefs A glance at the milestones of SHATEC Bibliography 60 85 26 120 The flame that ignites the growth of hotel schools 27 Culinary Eat your humble pie PART THREE The future of SHATEC 122 30 38 39 41 New board equal commitment Changing with the times Is there still a need for SHATEC today 44 3 Developing Hospitality Talent 4 Developing Hospitality Talent Foreword by the President Singapore Hotel Association On behalf of the Singapore Hotel Association (SHA) I would like to extend my heartiest congratulations to SHATEC on this very special occasion which marks 30 years of its contribution to excellence in hospitality education. Since its inception on July 2 1 983 we have witnessed the growth of SHATEC from strength to strength as an industry school. Today I am happy to learn that SHATEC has some 30 000 alumni many of whom are now leaders in hospitality. In the last 30 years SHATEC has forged ahead and carved for itself a brand name in hospitality training and education not only in Singapore but in the region as well. As the story of SHATEC unfolds itself within the pages of this book you will find that the school borne out of the Association s simple vision to help the industry with quality manpower has surpassed its expectations with its list of achievements. It is no doubt one of SHA s invaluable contributions to the industry. All this would not have been possible without the drive and passion of all those who have had a hand in building SHATEC. In particular I would like to acknowledge Mr Pakir Singh and his team for steering the school for more than 20 years. It leaves me now to express my heartfelt thanks to all our stakeholders for their contributions and for believing in SHATEC. With your support I am confident of a continued bright future for SHATEC. Mdm Kay Kuok 5 Developing Hospitality Talent Foreword by Chairman SHATEC Today marks a proud moment for SHATEC. From its humble beginnings 30 years ago SHATEC has through its sheer dedication and support from the industry managed to build itself into a brand name for quality hospitality education in Singapore and the region. As chronicled in this book the pioneer team led by Mr Pakir Singh played an instrumental role in laying the foundation for SHATEC to take shape and grow. To this end SHATEC has done well given the numerous accolades that it has received over the years. Its list of illustrious alumni a number of whom were interviewed in this book is yet another testament of its success as a hospitality school. The journey for SHATEC over the past 30 years has been a memorable and exciting one with many significant milestones being achieved. As an industry school it has kept its faith in its mission to train and nurture local talents for rewarding careers in the hospitality sector. Today SHATEC under the leadership of Ms Margaret Heng who is also the Executive Director of SHA continues to engage all our stakeholders to ensure that the school s programmes are robust and relevant to the industry. On this note I would like to thank all staff members alumni government agencies and all other partners who have given SHATEC the much needed support to succeed. As SHATEC moves forward to write its next chapter I am confident that your continued commitment and passion for the school will enable it to reach new heights. Mr Albert Teo 6 Developing Hospitality Talent Foreword by Author I designed this book in the hope it might touch several people To the Singapore Hotel Association Mr Pakir Singh and his team and all those who had a role in shaping SHATEC and who are helping to shape SHATEC congratulations. I can only hope the book captures well enough the work SHATEC has done for the industry here and in the region. It s a fantastic story and I hope the industry will remember and continue to back the little choo-choo train that can. To hotel CEOs and hoteliers I hope the section on Developing Hospitality Talent the journey continues will help reinforce the point that every industry is competing for talent and that the hotel industry must change quickly enough to cater to a generational shift in customers and staff which demands new approaches. To students and Gen Y hotel school graduates including my son Hatta Taha Teo I hope the lessons on what it takes to rise to the top by SHATEC graduates who have made it will show that the dreams that you dare to dream really do come true especially in this age of rainbow tourism . Thank you to everyone who has helped me with this book (see Bibliography) and to my life-partner Kurt Rufli who is always patient and supportive. Ms Raini Hamdi Raini Hamdi is a veteran journalist and her beat is the travel and tourism business. The PATA Journalist of the Year 2007 is author and senior editor of Singapore-based TTG Asia Media Asia s largest travel trade publishing house which celebrates its 40th anniversary in 201 4. Raini worked at SHA from 1 983 to 1 990 as staff writer then editor in charge of all SHA publications. She is a SHATEC graduate. 7 Developing Hospitality Talent 8 Developing Hospitality Talent The hotel industry A people builder July 2 1 983 Some things have not changed What drove the birth of SHATEC What it takes to build a hotel school The visionary Mr Pakir Money money money Timing and angel funders Love and affection PART ONE Pakir Singh father of Singapore s hospitality training 9 Developing Hospitality Talent The hotel industry A people builder HOTELS are easily celebrated as beautiful places for enhancing communities providing jobs and generating tourist dollars to the local economy. What does not immediately come to mind is how the industry gives education and life skills to people builds a base of managers and trainers who would ensure its future growth and spawns whole new industries such as hospitality training and culinary art. 10 Developing Hospitality Talent July 2 1983 The late Dr Tay Eng Soon then Minister of State for Education (second from left) opening SHATEC on July2 1 983 When the SHA Board announced that the SHA would set up a quality training centre for the industry some members in the travel trade said that the SHA Board although dynamic was losing sense of reality. Others said the executive director of SHA (Mr Pakir Singh) although young was going senile. - The late Mr SC Huang SHA President from 1 961 to 1 983 up solely to meet the industry s need for skilled manpower. It was probably the only one in Asia that offered mid-management hotel training and contracted the well-known Ecole h teli re de Lausanne (EHL) to develop a diploma-level course second EHL trainers to Singapore to conduct the programme and set invigilate the examinations. It was probably the only dedicated hotel school in Asia with its own standalone campus equipped with a million-dollar food production and food service facilities. It was in short a pioneer in internationalstandard hotel training and education in Asia and it helped a string of other hotel schools to start up in the region. The story of SHATEC is a story of how an industry takes charge of its own survival and destiny. Like the little choo-choo train it is a story of a little school that can. 1 1 The SHATEC campus at Nassim Hill WHEN SHATEC opened on July 2 1 983 it was quite a rarity in the region. It was probably the only hotel school in Asia that was owned by the industry a not-for-profit set Developing Hospitality Talent Students using computers for training Tableside service the hallmark of fine dining Some things have not changed THE hotel industry is facing its worst-ever staff crunch. Lots of new rooms are coming online but few trained employees are available while hotels are not exactly first choice for a real career. Hoteliers increasingly worried are looking at training broadening job scopes and other productivity measures. It s a problem the Asian hotel industry is facing today but this was at the start of the 80 s in Singapore. An additional 13 500 rooms were going to open by 1 985 and some 18 000 new employees were needed. The IR of that time if you like was the Raffles City complex with its Westin Stamford (the world s tallest hotel then now Swissotel The Stamford) and Westin Plaza (now Fairmont) adding some 2 000 rooms in 1 986. Another new cluster was the Marina Square area which brought an additional 2 000 rooms through the Pan Pacific Marina Mandarin and Mandarin Oriental. Hotels like Sheraton Towers Amara Furama City Centre Bayview Landmark Village and Carlton also opened from the mid-80s while others like the Grand Hyatt built new wings. So it s rooms galore and like today imagine the opportunities for young people to join and rise in the industry as supervisors and managers. But unlike today where do they go to be trained as future hoteliers While there is so much choice today in Singapore back then there was only the Hotel Catering and Training School which was part of the Vocational and Industrial Training Board (VITB) . VITB is today the Institute of Technical Education Students perfecting their culinary skills through practical sessions 12 Developing Hospitality Talent The SHATEC team at Hotel Premier Dr Wong Kwei Cheong (at rostrum) Chairman of the Singapore Tourist Promotion Board (1 9841 985) addressing the guests in 1 985 What drove the birth of SHATEC WHAT was hotel training like in those days The Hotel Catering and Training School located next to the then Hotel Premier at Nassim Hill was an option for school-leavers especially those who did not shine academically to study craft-level courses in front office housekeeping and food preparation. For those who wished to study hotel management the recourse was bank-breaking for many study overseas in schools such as the University of Hawaii Cornell University in the US or the more popular polytechnics or hotel schools in Europe. Or get an external diploma or certificate from the American Hotel & Motel Association (AH&MA) which had a local chapter in Singapore. And that s basically it. From the industry perspective the lack of coordinated training and proper certification did not augur well for it. The reasons The industry needed to develop a strong core of supervisors and managers to lead it into the 90 s. To begin with it was not attracting the more educated school-leavers (they went to banks) partly because a hotel career was not seen as prestigious but also because the industry did not offer education that went beyond craft. NO. OF TRAINEES AT SHATEC FOR ALL COURSES 1 000 So while these school-leavers became skilled craftsmen after their training their potential for development into senior managers may be limited by their lack of basic education said a report of an overseas study mission to Japan Europe and the US in 1 982 conducted by SHA and government officials. The industry felt that hotels could train people inhouse on the skills taught by the Hotel Catering and Training School but that there was a need for higher training to develop supervisors and managers. SHATEC now has a total student population of about 1 000 students at any one time 30 per cent of whom are foreign students Qualityservicewaseverything While Singapore today is an aspirational The industry felt that hotels could train people in-house on the skills taught by the Hotel Catering and Training School but that there was a need for higher training to develop supervisors and managers. 13 Developing Hospitality Talent The big brand names were coming to town among them Westin Accor SAS InterContinental and Le Meridien. Western guests dominated travel unlike today where the customer is global and is changing Western concepts of hospitality. Programming SHATEC IN 1 982 SHA and government officials went to Japan Europe and the US to study the workings of hotel schools including the two icons Cornell Hotel School in the US and Ecole h teli re de Lausanne (EHL) and to observe how hotels in countries such as Japan Switzerland and Germany were operating productively and employing new technology. Said Ms Teo We looked at models like EHL which offered only a management programme a four-year diploma comprising two years of training and two years of internship. We also looked at apprenticeships where hotels and restaurants trained people (in housekeeping food preparation front office etc) and at craft schools in Germany and Switzerland. destination with world-class tourism attractions back then Singapore had lost a lot of its old buildings to economic development. The tourism product plan was to save what was left of historic districts such as Chinatown and Little India and rejuvenate the Singapore River. So quality service was the key weapon for the city to be one up on the competition in the region. But without better training how was there to be better quality service Boat Quay in the 1 980s Originally we wanted to do just a management (programme) we thought we could set up a Lausanne of the East. But we had to take over the craft-level courses of VITB so we ran the whole gamut. The three main courses offered by SHATEC when it opened were Three-year full-time Diploma in Hotel Management (now Higher Diploma of Hotel Management) designed to prepare students to be managers in the process attracting better-educated people (GCE A level holders) into the industry. One-year part-time course Certificate in Hotel Management for hotel supervisors and middle managers who had no formal education in hotel management Two-yearfull-timecraftlevel programme Certificate in Hotel Skills. It sraining angmohs The big brand names were coming to town among them Westin Accor SAS InterContinental and Le Meridien. Western guests dominated travel unlike today where the customer is global and is changing Western concepts of hospitality. But back then understanding Western ways and lifestyles was key to quality service one s got to know one s Bordeaux from Burgundy and deliver international-class service through better and deeper training. All this and the sheer number of rooms coming online essentially drove the birth of SHATEC in 1 983. 14 All three courses were endorsed by SHATEC EHL and National Productivity Board (now known as SPRING Singapore). Developing Hospitality Talent What it takes to build a hotel school VISION money timing and love and affection these were the four key factors that gave SHATEC a firm foundation. who ran with it. A visionary packed with killer persuasive powers and the gift of the gab Mr Pakir dreamed big with SHATEC. A good hotel school that churned out well-trained staff was not good enough for him it had to be the best hotel school in AsiaPacific and recognised as the centre for regional training in hospitality and service excellence . He was a man on a mission saying at the opening of SHATEC in 1 983 that he was sure SHATEC will be to Singapore what the Lausanne hotel school (EHL) is to Switzerland... within the decade . Said Ms Jennie Chua who was with the then Singapore Tourist Promotion Board (STPB) as Director of a newly-created Singapore Convention Bureau and STPB Director SHATEC receives the prestigious Most Outstanding Contribution to Tourism award in 1 992 The visionary Mr Pakir The idea for SHATEC was initiated by the late Dr Tay Eng Soon then Singapore s Minister of State for Education and also chairman of VITB said Mr Pakir Singh former Executive Director of SHA and CEO of SHATEC. He had invited me out for lunch to discuss the setting up of a hospitality school in Singapore. He was a first mover and our champion. After initiating the move he went on to secure funding and further support from the government Mr Pakir said. But if Dr Tay had mooted the idea it was Mr Pakir Pakir is unique in his passion to grow SHATEC. Ms Jennie Chua 15 Developing Hospitality Talent Most training centres take 10-15 years to establish themselves. We want to do it in five to seven years. This is really tuning to market demand. Everything planned at SHATEC is a reflection of what the industry needs... - Mr Pakir Singh former Executive Director of SHA and CEO SHATEC (The Straits Times July 2 1 985) Mr Pakir Singh with the team overseeing industry human resource matters Pakir is unique in his passion to grow SHATEC. If you say oh we all played a role with SHATEC and so forth no. Pakir was the leader. We supported him. We believed in what he was doing and he did it not to make a name for himself but to fulfill the needs of the industry. He could have done other things in life but SHA and SHATEC were his whole life. Mr Pakir was also ahead of his time in envisioning that Asian staff could rise to top positions in the hotel industry and that the Asian travel century would come which is now 30 years later. Mr Chanin Donavanik CEO of Dusit Hotels & Resorts in Thailand whose Dusit Thani College was set up with SHATEC s expertise summed up Mr Pakir s vision Pakir believed in training and education. He believed in the future of the Asian travel industry. He believed in the young people of Asia. 16 Dusit Thani College Key staff at SHATEC in the 80s Developing Hospitality Talent Ms Teo Poh Kheam former SHA Deputy Executive Director and SHATEC Assistant Chief Executive Money money money The sums to set up the best hotel school in AsiaPacific were daunting. SHA being an association did not have that kind of money. It was agreed that SHATEC would take over the Hotel Catering and Training School. The bill to renovate and equip the school with three new kitchens (a production kitchen an individual stove kitchen and a demonstration kitchen) a computer room with 1 terminals eight 1 classrooms with audio-visual aids and a function room came up to around S 1.7 million. SHATEC also decided to work with only the best. It contracted EHL till today the leading Swiss hotel school. We were crash-starting and we needed to have the credibility factor from the hotels and students which EHL immediately brought said Ms Teo Poh Kheam Mr Pakir s deputy of the EHL contract. The Higher Diploma in Hotel Management was essentially developed by Lausanne-based trainers. As part of the annual contract EHL seconded trainers to SHATEC (among the pioneers were Emilio Lavarini and Alan Palmer) to implement the programme with our local trainers who were former VITB teachers and new recruits. Price of instant credibility S 1 million a year according to sources. This was enough to send SHATEC packing off local trainers for further training and education overseas in order to develop future trainers of its own. Bill Around S 100 000 per trainer. It also developed trainee instructors by putting them through the higher diploma course at SHATEC. In the first six months the school was running one local trainer was sponsored for a threeyear Bachelor of Science Degree in Hotel Management Course at the University of Surrey while among the students studying at SHATEC were three sponsored trainee instructors one of whom was Willie Ong now Vice President of Ascott Centre for Excellence. Funds were also needed for further expansion of training facilities such as when SHATEC took over then Hotel Premier owned by Temasek for training. Classroom at Nassim Hill Training kitchen at Hotel Premier 1 7 Developing Hospitality Talent Overseas training First batch to Malaysia SHATEC student participating in a bartending competition There are two SHAs The Swiss connection WHILE SHATEC celebrates 30 years of founding this year over in Lausanne the Swiss horn is also being blown as EHL celebrates its 120th anniversary. Why did SHA contract EHL and not say Cornell when it set up SHATEC Said Ms Teo Cornell was an undergraduate programme and it was not possible to implement at the time due to rules of private education. Even if we could it would not be suitable too academic as we wanted to develop people with strong technical and operating skills with potential for further development in management competencies. The higher diploma programme at EHL met our requirements exactly. EHL also was still is the leading Swiss school and it was natural to want to work only with the best. At the opening of SHATEC on July 2 1 983 Mr Peter Tresch then President of the Swiss Hotel Association pointed out that both SHAs shared the same philosophy . 18 Not only do we have the same (SHA acronym) we also have to a wide extent the same philosophy. I was glad to learn SHA has constantly emphasised that the quality of the tourism product in Singapore depends to a large extent on the kind of training employees receive. We think and act on exactly the same lines. Many years ago we became aware that only a skilled and properly trained workforce would enable us to compete at the international level. Our ancestors therefore opened the Lausanne hotel school in 1893. Ever since the school has remained a major part of our association...a complete unite de doctrine in that part of our activities. On such a common fundamental rule it will be no problem to build an open-hearted and open-minded cooperation between the two SHAs. The respect and understanding between the two SHAs enabled training and education to be adapted to the local industry s needs. Said Mr Derrick Lee who was with SHATEC from 1 984 to 2006 as a Head of Department The syllabus that was handed down by Lausanne was constantly updated or adjusted to be current with the local industry practices so that our students would easily assimilate into the industry during their internship. We often held discussions with committee members of the Food & Beverage Managers Association to get updates on current practices and incorporate those into the teaching. It wasn t solely teaching from textbooks. The Swiss standards were high. Ms Teo recalled the Swiss being Swiss would only insist on the best. When we opened Restaurant SHATEC at Hotel Premier Milo (Emilio Laverini) and Derrick would decide the logistics like how many pieces of plates we needed. I remember a dining plate then was S 25 per piece Milo had to buy Langenthal. The pots and pans had to be Spring so expensive Developing Hospitality Talent School to SHATEC Associate Professor Law Song Seng then VITB director was quoted in the media as saying that VITB welcomed the idea as SHA could better determine its members training needs and mobilise their support conduct training with the help of expert trainers through its close association with overseas institutions and that the move would not duplicate training efforts and facilities. If it was not for the support and a funding of nearly S 1 million that the late Dr Tay had sought from the government via the Skills Development Fund (SDF) it was doubtful that SHATEC would have seen the light of day. SDF also made it palatable for hotels to sponsor students by subsidising 70 per cent of the tuition fee of S 21 000 for the three-year higher diploma programme and student allowance. Said Ms Teo SHATEC devised a scheme whereby GCE A level students straight from school could be employed by hotels even though the hotel was under construction and not necessarily operating at the time. To qualify as employees hotels had to pay them an allowance while they attended school or when they were attached to their respective hotels for internship. STPB also contributed S 1 million over three years to SHATEC to help cover part of the capital spending in taking over then Hotel Premier in 1 985 as a simulated hotel training facility. But as with the local comedy film title it was always Money No Enough. Said Ms Teo The biggest challenge was funding. We were an association so there was barely enough. Pakir didn t believe in borrowing so we relied on trade renovation contractors who gave us a year credit and we paid them when SDF paid us for example. The tight finances translated to operations. We couldn t have enough staff. In the beginning we didn t have a full-time maintenance person so I had to be there early mornings to open the school gates. One day the key was missing and I had to climb through an aircon hole to get into the building she recalled with a laugh. 1 9 Service with a Smile Timing and angel funders The timing was opportune for SHA to set up a hotel school. In the 80s wealth and production were migrating to newly-industrialising economies. Singapore was embarking on a second industrial revolution a drive from manufacturing to higher-technology industries as labour became cheaper in neighbouring countries. So there was emphasis on equipping Singapore workers for jobs of the future (read better educated and more skilled) through continuing education training and retraining and on ensuring the product of schooling would meet an industry s manpower needs. In fact the government believed the industry was in a better position to determine its training needs and was ready to support these efforts. In handing over the Hotel Catering & Training Graduation Ceremony in 2001 Developing Hospitality Talent The sponsored students rate for the full-time major courses at SHATEC in 1 983 was 75 per cent. This dipped to 46 per cent in 1 985. Hotels faced with lower profits as a result of the recession cut the training budget while some new hotels delayed their opening. SHATEC s inaugural graduation ceremony in 1 986 Train. Do it IT costs more to hire a new staff than to gain a new client according to Mr Giovanni Angelini veteran hotel CEO and consultant who urges hotel owners and hoteliers never to cut back on training dollars no matter how bad business is. I strongly believe to gain a new customer costs you five times more than to retain an existing customer. But to hire a new staff will cost you more than five times than to retain a good employee. You have to train the new person get him to buy into the culture etc. Forty per cent of the time you lose him during probation he said. Mr Angelini said the best system was to allocate a percentage of payroll to training and education and to base GMs goals on revenue rather than profit. He said In bad times if your target is based on profit and not much revenue is coming in what do you think a GM will do He will cut cost to meet the profit target. And usually the first three costs to go are training advertising and maintenance. But if the target is based on revenue the GM will be focused on driving revenue instead of focusing on cutting cost. There is always business even in crises. If you have no revenue you need to market more not less. Cutting training is always a bad idea. And cutting maintenance will cause the product to suffer he said. Mr Angelini said training was crucial for two reasons This industry hires a lot of young people without experience therefore you need to train. Secondly customers preferences and habits constantly change. Look at how technology has changed the way they book accommodation. So training is essential so that everyone keeps up with the changes. So train. Do it Mr Giovanni Angelini former CEO Shangri-La Hotels & Resorts Cutting training is always a bad idea 20 Developing Hospitality Talent Love and affection To succeed SHATEC needed the total support of members said the late Mr S C Huang SHA President at the school s opening on July 2 1 983. Mr Pakir believed there was a lot of love and affection in the industry for SHATEC a soundbite that was much picked up by the press then. But SHATEC opened as the world was headed for an economic slowdown. Arrivals declined and occupancy tumbled to 76 per cent in 1 983 compared with 81 per cent in 1 982. The recession and other crises through the decades would affect the number of students sponsored by member hotels at SHATEC love and affection notwithstanding. Even from day one newspaper commentaries were scathing that only Raffles City had sponsored the largest number of students for the higher diploma programme 55 places out of 136 places. Nine other hotels had sponsored what a newspaper opinion viewed as only a token two or few students each. The sponsored students rate for the full-time major courses at SHATEC in 1 983 was 75 per cent. This dipped to 46 per cent in 1 985. Hotels faced with lower profits as a result of the recession cut the training budget while some new hotels delayed their opening. But the fact that SHATEC was running at full capacity with an enrolment of around 700 students in 1 985 many of them paying their own way was in my view the best testimony of the quality of its courses the late Dr Tay had said during a SHATEC graduation ceremony in October 1 . 987 The school also started attracting foreign students from Brunei Malaysia Thailand Bhutan even France. Changing the mindsets on training dollars Mr Lim Sin Hoa (left) Ex-President SHA interacting with industry partners. Something learnt is never lost. That was the philosophy we tried to inculcate in the industry. And thank god we did it (SHATEC). If we didn t we wouldn t have this base (of people) that we have today. - Mr Ricky Goh (above third from left) SHA president (November 1 987 to September 1 993) WHILE the recession of the mid-80 s tested the commitment of the industry towards training Mr Ricky Goh SHA President from November 1 987 to September 1 993 also recalled that changing the mindsets of owners towards training was another challenge. Owners were not warmed up to training yet as it costs money. Some also thought Why should I train only to have someone else poach my staff So to get owners to be committed to training especially in the early years was tough. We also had a fair share of expat GMs on a twoyear contract and some of them did not necessarily see the long-term commitment to training as it was a cost to their operation. During the time I was SHA President other parts of the world were opening up. It s true our trained staff would be poached not just by another local hotel but others in the region. But we always tried to tell the members you can t stop people from leaving. You can t stop a person from dreaming. The person you train he too dreams to be somebody someday. He needs to move on to gain the experience. Let him go. When he comes back he would have learnt something else which he would give back to you. Something learnt is never lost. That was the philosophy we tried to inculcate in the industry. And thank god we did it (SHATEC). If we didn t we wouldn t have this base (of people) that we have today. 21 Developing Hospitality Talent Pakir Singh the father of Singapore s hospitality training MRPAKIR Singh was executive director of SHA and CEO SHATEC from 1 979 to 2005. He was the architect of SHATEC the most ambitious project undertaken by SHA to-date. This email interview with him was done in January 2013 Mr Pakir Singh (second from right) interacting with SHA Board Members How did the idea for SHATEC first come about The late Dr Tay Eng Soon then Minister of State for Education had invited me out for lunch to discuss the possibility of setting up a hospitality school in Singapore. He was a first mover and our champion. After initiating the move he went on to secure funding and further support from the government. staff at SHATEC including Teo Poh Kheam Seah Joo Ee Margaret Heng Derrick Lee Ann Ang Alan Palmer Chia Cho Hwa and many others. Both the SHA Board and the SHATEC Board gave strong moral support and guidance and most importantly freedom for us to build the SHATEC spirit among students and staff. The then Singapore Tourist Promotion Board also helped tremendously. As did (then) Ministry of Labour in giving us access to its Skills Development Fund. The owners CEOs and General Managers of the all hotels big and small in Singapore helped to provide training stints raise funds and promised jobs for SHATEC graduates. There were very many involved in helping us to establish SHATEC and its developments through the years without them all there would be no SHATEC. Mr Pakir Singh with a graduate BIG NUMBER WhatwasyourvisionforSHATEC 30 000 22 To be the best hotel school in the Asia-Pacific and recognised as the centre for regional training in hospitality and service excellence. The strength of SHATEC s alumni today comprising individuals from more than 20 countries across about all seven continents Who helped you the most in establishing SHATEC and in its development through the years My dedicated team administrative and teaching Whatwerethebiggestchallengesinsetting itupandasitgrew The biggest challenge was survival and Developing Hospitality Talent There was an urgent need in the 1 980s for Singapore to develop skilled manpower for the hotel trade and industry. Singapore needed workers for the many hotels that were being built and I wanted to help solve the problem. Prof Tommy Koh presents Mr Pakir Singh with the Lifetime Achievement Award in 2004 Mr Pakir Singh at the first SHATEC graduation ceremony sustainability. SHA organised seminars and meetings to harness the support of the community and raise the level of awareness regarding the importance of this fledgling school. Money space and the right people to run the school were constant preoccupations. As the student enrolment numbers grew we had to relocate several times from the old Hotel Premier in Nassim Hill to Mount Sophia finally to our fully-owned premises at Bukit Batok. The hotel industry went through its ups and downs e.g. feeling the impact of the Gulf War in 1 991 which affected the Singapore tourism adversely and SHATEC too. excellence for its own sake. And service training if well provided would result in service excellence. What to you were SHATEC s biggest breakthroughs We were able to open four commercial operations in town run and managed by SHATEC trainees staff and graduates two finedining restaurants Rosette first at Nassim Hill then the Executive Club in OCBC Building Petals a contemporary fusion restaurant in the Treasury Building and SHA Villa a 40-room accommodation at Lloyd Road. a worthwhile experience to come to the school and for being given a second chance in an environment that was different from mainstream education that was available then. My saddest moment was six years ago when I realised that it was beyond my abilities having been diagnosed with a degenerative disease to carry on expanding and bringing the school up to its next best level. When I finally had to take my leave it was with some regret. But it was a necessary step for the betterment of the institution that I had been identified with since 1 983. Whywereyouverypassionateabouthotel training & education There was an urgent need in the 1 980s for Singapore to develop skilled manpower for the hotel trade and industry. Singapore needed workers for the many hotels that were being built and I wanted to help solve the problem. I always felt that there was room to grow (no pun intended). I myself believed in the pursuit of Whattoyouwasitsbiggestcontributionto the industry in Singapore and the region We were able to help regional hospitality schools grow along with us in Singapore such as the Dusit Thani College in Thailand and the hotel school in Nepal. What s SHATEC s opportunity today Any regrets I have not kept up with the scene but prior to leaving I was keenly aware that other hospitality schools and centres were being set up in Singapore and the region and these were beginning to provide healthy competition to SHATEC. None whatsoever. I was happy to know that many graduates of SHATEC felt that it was 23 Developing Hospitality Talent 24 Developing Hospitality Talent Reach out and touch The flame that ignites the growth of hotel schools Culinary Eat your humble pie PART TWO 25 Developing Hospitality Talent Reach out and touch THE 90 s saw SHATEC laying the building bricks to be the torchbearer of quality hospitality training and education in the region. Affiliations with renowned universities for degree programmes were established which spoke for the quality training at SHATEC. Among the universities where SHATEC diploma graduates could earn transfer credits to were the University of Massachusetts University of Nevada Las Vegas University of Surrey and the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology. Its graduates and students were egged on to participate in local regional and international culinary competitions and they kept winning medals further raising the profile of the school and the culinary trade among other young people. The Higher Diploma in Hotel Management programme helped the industry break through the GCE A level cohort of schoolleavers for the first time attracting the better-qualified students which the industry desired to secure its future supervisors and managers. The school also helped boost the industry s image as an attractive career house by participating in career fairs in Singapore giving lectures at schools and opening the school to student visits. High-ranking visitors from the government hotel sector and academia of other countries also visited SHATEC and before long the Singapore hotel industry was helping its sisters and brothers in the region to develop their own present and future hoteliers. SHATEC was really reaching out and the three biggest contributions it made beyond the main objective of fulfilling the industry s manpower needs at the time were igniting the interest in Singapore and the region for hospitality training making those who think cooks are mere labourers eat humble pie and helping change the mindsets of young people about a career in the hotel industry. 26 Developing Hospitality Talent e a e t at ignites t e gro t o otel sc ools Guess who is holding the fort at the training academies that have sprung up to churn out people to power the industry Many of them were former SHATEC trainers and SHATEC graduates. THERE is now a gamut of hospitality training schools in Singapore and the region privatelyrun ones polytechnics vocational institutions hotel chains own academies you name it but the grandmother was SHATEC said Ms Jennie Chua. SHATEC was the earliest form of focused hotel training (in Singapore). It gave substance and form to the concept of training and that led to hotel companies having their own training academies ACE (Ascott Centre for Excellence) or Raffles International Training Centre for example. Twenty or 30 years ago hotels were busy with other issues like hotel reservations systems as there were no computers no Internet and there Flagship SHATEC building at Nassim Hill was insufficient critical mass for them to train. Today there s critical mass and they think if I m sending 100 people to SHATEC for training why can t I do it myself So SHATEC spawned the different in-house training institutions for hotel groups and restaurant groups even said Ms Chua. As hotel investment gained momentum in the 1 990s not just in Singapore but the region and with SHATEC s capacity limited to just about 1 000 students on average per year hotel groups began to set up their own centres and or look to other sources for trained people. Guess who is holding the fort at the training academies that have sprung up to churn out people to power the industry Many of them 27 Developing Hospitality Talent The late Dr Tay Eng Soon then Minister of State for Education visiting SHATEC Delegates from Myanmar visit SHATEC Mr Pakir Singh and delegates whipping up a storm at the SHATEC kitchen DTC opened in June 1 993 as a vocational school modelled after SHATEC and Pakir was our consultant and advisor. We had visited several well-known institutes and we like what we saw at SHATEC. Pakir was wellknown to us and a good friend of Dusit s owner so we asked him to help give us input. This led to the formal agreement with SHATEC. - Ms Veera Pardpattanapanich Rector DTC 28 were former SHATEC trainers and SHATEC graduates. If you look at other training institutes you will find a SHATEC graduate either heading the institute or being a trainer there said ACE Vice President Mr Willie Ong. Mr Ong himself was one of the trainee instructors that SHATEC recruited in 1 983 and put through the higher diploma programme. Asked what he had taken from SHATEC and applied to ACE Mr Ong said Teaching beyond books whatever is taught must be practical. The knowledge skills and attitude must be applicable to the work. The SHATEC tree also branched to the region. The Dusit Thani College (DTC) was one of the schools SHATEC helped set up in 1 993 another was the Nepal hotel school. Ms Veera Pardpattanapanich Rector DTC said DTC opened in June 1 993 as a vocational school modelled after SHATEC and Pakir was our consultant and advisor. We had visited several well-known institutes and we like what we saw at SHATEC. Pakir was well-known to us and a good friend of Dusit s owner so we asked him to give us his inputs. This led to the formal agreement with SHATEC. In addition to Pakir himself there were two senior SHATEC instructors Josef Ng and Dorothy Wong to help us launch and train the teachers. By 2000 aside from Thailand and Nepal SHATEC had conducted training and certification for Developing Hospitality Talent hospitality executives in many ASEAN countries including Malaysia Indonesia the Philippines Myanmar and Vietnam and China the Seychelles and Mauritius. As Secretary-General for several terms of the ASEAN Tourism Association an umbrella body of the ASEAN countries hotel and restaurant associations travel agency associations and airlines SHA through Mr Pakir played a part in the development of ASEAN tourism. The Singapore Tourism Board under Chief Executive Mr Tan Chin Nam then was also championing regionalisation expounding the idea that the ASEAN hinterland gave a broader dimension to the Singapore sell and urging Singapore tourism companies to look beyond Singapore for growth. At times some of our members misunderstood the intention as external training took away our people s time. But I always encouraged helping others as it spoke well for SHATEC and raised its image further said Mr Ricky Goh SHA President (November 1 987 to September 1 993). Said Ms Chua Pakir realised that if SHATEC was successful there would be approaches from outside Singapore which he would have to take on but his primary goal was Singapore. Networking with industry partners Dusit Thani College We think of SHATEC as the big sister Mr Chanin Donavanik President & CEO Dusit Hotels & Resorts I think no one has done more than Pakir to help the Asian industry establish hotel schools. Mr Pakir Singh receiving his honorary PhD conferred by Dusit Thani University FOR Mr Chanin Donavanik President & CEO Dusit Hotels & Resorts which owns and operates the Dusit Thani College SHATEC is the big sister . Recalling how the college came about Mr Chanin said My mum (Chanut Piyaoui) fell in love with the hotel industry but the business was difficult for her in the beginning as she had no knowledge of it. That s why she wanted to set up a school so young people could have it better than she did. She pushed me to do it. Luckily I found Pakir who was willing to help and had the same vision to develop local talent. I put the two visionaries together and we created the Dusit Thani Foundation and DTC. We owe a lot to Pakir and SHATEC said Mr Chanin. I think no one has done more than Pakir to help the Asian industry establish hotel schools. He was flying all over the place giving speeches about his belief in Asians he kept telling me why are people going to North America and Europe when the best service is in Asia 29 Developing Hospitality Talent The Singapore team bagging 8 Golds and 3 Silvers at the Taste of Canada Competition Toronto in 1 989 Singapore s breakthrough as a gastronomic capital really happened in the late 1 980s during the 1 990s and in the past decade. SHATEC has been the first and in its time most important contributor to the various aspects of gastronomic professions in Singapore. - Mr Peter Knipp CEO Peter Knipp Holdings linar at o r er pie Gourmet Summit in Singapore Singapore s breakthrough as a gastronomic capital really happened in the late 1 980s during the 1 990s and in the past decade. SHATEC has been the first and in its time most important contributor to the various aspects of gastronomic professions in Singapore. Its support service has been instrumental in shaping the country s f ood and beverage scene. It s indeed hard to believe that Singapore s F&B scene once was more bland than porridge. Independent restaurants started springing up only in the early 90s veteran Chef and Culinary Consultant Mr Otto Weibel also recalled. Their creative ideas and new concepts drew guests away from hotel restaurants which woke up IN this industry anything is possible. Jobs that are unglamorous today might be the most sought-after ones tomorrow. There is no better example of this than the rise of the humble cook of 30 years ago to celebrity chef status today firing up the imagination of many young minds to be one someday. In the F&B scene SHATEC has produced its own share of celebrity chefs restaurateurs and wine masters the Justin Queks Eric Teos Ignatius Chans Lim Hwee Pengs of the industry and supported the growth of the culinary scene in Singapore. Said Mr Peter Knipp CEO Peter Knipp Holdings which organises the annual World 30 Chef Eric Teo ET Culinary Arts Singapore Developing Hospitality Talent Mr Otto Weibel veteran chef and culinary consultant and fought back by creating more unique F&B experiences remember for instance what Grand Hyatt did with its open-kitchen Mezza9 This sizzling F&B sector could count on a stream of aspiring chefs from SHATEC said Mr Weibel which at the time was the only school that focused on culinary skills through its certificate courses in food preparation including the NTC-1 the most advanced level skills training for chefs which SHATEC launched in 1 990. And how the industry also helped shape SHATEC students embracing and nursing the young ones to fly off in their careers. By the mid-90s SHATEC-trained chefs had gained reputation as young people with fire in their belly who could endure the fire in the kitchen. SHATEC graduates and students were winning medals at culinary competitions (see list of awards) and their training was perceived as effective. SHATEC s then Head of Department and Lecturer Alan Palmer who was seconded from EHL in 1 983 and subsequently stayed on with SHATEC also helped found the Singapore Chefs Association (SCA) in 1 984 and played an active role in the World Association of Chefs (WAC) which held its world congress in Singapore in 1 990. SCA and WAC never failed to expose SHATEC students to prestigious culinary competitions. Mr Palmer led the Singapore national culinary team as team manager in Vancouver in 1 987 and the SHATEC student culinary team in Toronto in Mr Alan Palmer (extreme left) with the SHATEC team bagging 1 Gold and 2 Silvers at the Chefs on Parade Competition Philippines in 1 991 Winners at the National Skills Competition 1 998 Winners from the Taste of Canada Competition Toronto in 1 993 (4 Golds 2 Silvers) 31 Developing Hospitality Talent Award winners for the SHATEC - Australian Wine Education Awards (SAWEA) in 2001 1 989 (which swiped eight golds and three silvers) and in 1 993. F&B luminaries such as Mr Knipp who was a young chef at a five star hotel in Singapore in the 80 s and executive chef at Raffles Hotel in the 90 s too mentored and exposed SHATEC trainees to the international arena. Since Mr Knipp s World Gourmet Summit started in 1 997 SHATEC students have been roped in as helpers in master classes and in the execution of the event as and when required. Other events such as Food&HotelAsia and its Salon Culinaire have also been instrumental in developing SHATEC as an organisation and its students. Said Mr Knipp For young people especially in their formative years their creative outlets are culinary competitions. We ve always made sure that SHATEC was involved from every angle. We ve also covered SHATEC and the students many times in our publication Cuisine & Wine Asia and in our weekly ezines. Asked what he thought of SHATEC trainees Mr Knipp said SHATEC was the first organisation to promote culinary competency and 32 Students performing at a theme party knowledge and many SHATEC students have as a result become successful in their respective endeavours whether as chefs pastry chefs in service or F&B in general. Its growing list of alumni which includes names like Ignatius Chan Justin Quek and Lim Hwee Peng bears testimony to its success. Added Mr Weibel The school taught them the basics but also prepared them for the real world. That s most important. Young people only see the glamorous side of the profession not the fact that when a person enters the culinary field his life goes upside down because he works many days in a stretch long hours endures lots of hardship. That has to be taught. The late Dr Tay Eng Soon interacting with SHATEC student chefs Developing Hospitality Talent Young people only see the glamorous side of the profession not the fact that when a person enters the culinary field his life goes upside down because he works many days in a stretch long hours endures lots of hardship. That has to be taught. SHATEC students learning the tools of the trade in the 80s Rosette The SHATEC restaurant at Dhoby Ghaut 1st National Skills Competition in 1 994 33 Developing Hospitality Talent Concierge of the Year winner in 2000 SHATEC won the Culinary Institution of the Year award at World Gourmet Summit 2001 A track record of winning Awards SHATEC students and alumni have bagged through the years 2012 Race (1st Runner Up) Food&HotelAsia Culinary Challenge (1 Gold 3 Silvers and 5 Bronzes) National Cocktail Competition - Student s Category (1 Gold 1 Silver and 1 Bronze) World Skills Competition Cooking Category (Bronze) 2009 2011 Inducted into the World Gourmet Summit Hall of Fame for winning Culinary Institute of the Year 2001-2004 Finalist in the Young Hope Escoffier Asia Contest 2009 in Shanghai China Teo Cheong Hai Poh Jasmine Ng Randy Chow David Toh) WA Oceanafest Australia (1 Gold 2 Silvers) 2004 23rd National Cocktail Competition 2011 (1st Runner up) World Skills Competition Restaurant Service Category (Silver) Chefs on Parade Competition Philippines (1 Bronze) Western Australia Oceanafest - Training Provider Category (Silver) 2008 2010 Food&HotelAsia Culinary Challenge (1 Gold 1 Silver) WorldSkills Singapore 2008 Restaurant Service (National Champion) IKA Olympiade Der Koche Singapore National Culinary Team (3 Golds and 1 Silver Champion in the Cold Table Pastry category) World Gourmet Summit Awards of Excellence (Culinary Institute of the Year Chef of the Year F&B Manager of the Year Sommelier of the Year) Singapore Quality Class for Private Education Organisation 2003 World Gourmet Summit Awards of Excellence (Culinary Institute of the Year Chef of the Year Executive Chef of the Year Sommelier of the Year) Food&HotelAsia Culinary Challenge (Best Apprentice Team 1 Gold 2 Silvers 2 Bronzes) McCain Foods Creative Culinary Contest (Champion) 4th Penang Chefs Challenge (Champion). The Amazing Waiter 34 2007 FHM Culinaire Malaysia (1 Gold 1 Silver) Salut A Taste of Excellence (Special Tribute Eric 2002 2006 National Skills Competition (1 Gold 2 Silvers) World Gourmet Summit Awards of Excellence (Culinary Institute of the Year Sommelier of the Year) Developing Hospitality Talent Winners at the Food&HotelAsia 1 994 Culinary Champion in 1 987 2001 Association of Pastry Chefs UK Dessert of the Year (First Prize) 4th SHA Restaurant Skills Competition (Champion) 1 996 1 994 1 993 National Skills Competition (2 Golds) 1 990 2000 Salon Culinaire Food&HotelAsia (3 Golds 2 Silvers) National Skills Competition (2 Golds) Salon Culinaire Food&HotelAsia (Top Apprentice Team) Prima Celebrations Cake Competition (Top in Amateur Category) Veuve Cliquot Ponsardin Champagne (King of Champagne Award) Singapore Tourism Awards (Tourism Host of the Year Hotel Tourism Host of the Year Restaurant Tourism Host of the Year Travel Agency) Concierge of the Year Award (Winner) World Gourmet Summit Awards of Excellence (Culinary Institute of the Year Best Chef of the Year) Taste of Canada Competition Toronto (4 Golds 2 Silvers) Chefs on Parade Competition Philippines (1 Gold 3 Silvers) 1 989 1 987 Taste of Canada Competition Toronto (8 Golds 3 Silvers) 1 999 1 998 Singapore Tourism Awards (Winner Tourism Host of the Year Hotel) Singapore Tourism Awards (Outstanding Contribution to Tourism) Salon Culinaire Food&Hotel Asia (1 Gold 3 Silvers) 1 992 World Culinary Arts Festival (1 Gold) 1 986 National Skills Competition (2 Golds 1 Silver) Chefs on Parade Competition Philippines (1Gold with Honours 2 Silvers) 35 1 991 Salon Culinaire Food&HotelAsia (3 Silvers) Hotelympia London (1 Silver) Developing Hospitality Talent 36 Developing Hospitality Talent The future of SHATEC New board equal commitment Is there still a need for SHATEC today Changing with the times PART THREE 37 Developing Hospitality Talent The future of SHATEC THE 2000s was a difficult decade for SHATEC. It suddenly found itself facing competition for the first time from other hospitality schools. Its visionary and CEO Mr Pakir Singh retired in 2005 due to illness his were big shoes to fill. As well the huge crises of the decade including SARS in 2003 and the global financial crisis which began in 2007 and still holds the world economy to ransom also re-shaped SHA and consequently SHATEC. SARS which left the industry terribly vulnerable brought Singapore hotel owners together to tackle the crisis and was the turning point for owners to play an active role in SHA which had all along been run by hotel operators. Mdm Kay Kuok President of SHA and Executive Chairman of Shangri-La Hotel Singapore recalled the awful SARS days Owners working with the operators realised we could not sustain all our costs if there was no business. All of us would rather not retrench staff but we had to save some labour costs and the only way we could do that was to get the unions to help us. To get this done we had to come together and approach STB (Singapore Tourism Board) which was supportive and helped be the liaison between industry and union. We came up with schemes leave no pay leave in the worst-case scenario etc and we realised during this period that owners work well together when push comes to shove. We were effective in protecting the industry during that crisis and the owners were doing it themselves not through SHA as we were not part of the Board of the association then. Today the SHA Board office-bearers are all owners while the majority of its board members are owners or ownerrepresentatives. Their perspectives and convictions on training and education would shape SHATEC. 38 Developing Hospitality Talent New Board equarl commitment OWNERS showed they had time for and were committed to SHATEC. When Mr Pakir retired the SHA Board agreed to hire a separate full-time CE for SHATEC who would run the school on a commercial basis for the benefit of the industry don t have to make a profit but must be self-sustaining Madam Kuok said. Alas there was a succession of three CEs in a matter of five years with the role now being held by Ms Margaret Heng SHA s Executive Director as before when Mr Pakir was the concurrent head of both SHA and SHATEC. In 2006 Mdm Kuok also appointed two of the industry s top hoteliers Mrs Diana Ee-Tan at the time Managing Director of Raffles Hotels & Resorts and Mr Loh Lik Peng Founder Director of Unlisted Collection to study and recommend ways to strengthen SHATEC. Mdm Kuok also strengthened the SHATEC Board by encouraging a more diverse membership comprising not just industry members but high- SHATEC s existing campus at Bukit Batok Don t have to make a profit but must be self-sustaining - Mdm Kay Kuok President of SHA and Executive Chairman of Shangri-La Hotel Singapore standing individuals from the academia and related government agencies. Said Mrs Ee-Tan We thought going forward the curriculum could be deepened. For example students were being taught mainly the technical aspects of running a restaurant but not necessarily the business aspects for operating a successful one. Thus key areas such as a proper understanding of food costs purchasing menucosting marketing and promotions needed to be emphasised so that when a student graduated should he decide to open a small restaurant he would at least have a basic understanding of the business aspects. Ms Margaret Heng Executive Director SHA and Chief Executive of SHATEC 39 Developing Hospitality Talent Launch of SHA Villa The SHATEC Hotel by Dr Ng Eng Hen on July 24 2003 50-room SHA Villa Having the owners on board SHA is a good thing. SHA was able to finance for example SHATEC s fully-owned premises (in Bukit Batok). The owners took an interest in the lease terms they are real estate people they are in a strong position to make good decisions. - Mrs Diana Ee-Tan Chairman Academic and Examination Advisory Council SHATEC and SHATEC Board Member We also thought the curriculum must be relevant. For instance revenue management was not a core subject only a small module but with the Internet revolution knowledge about online reservations and yield management was becoming increasingly important. Training facilities too had to be relevant it was important that students understood how to work well with induction ovens not just conventional ovens for example. Other recommendations included consolidating the three restaurants into one but that one had to be cutting-edge and giving up the 50-room SHA Villa providing students with attachments at member hotels instead so they could be exposed to real market segments and the latest revenue management systems. 40 All of the recommendations were accepted and implemented. Said Mrs Ee-Tan when asked about the effect of owners on SHATEC Having the owners on board SHA is a good thing. SHA was able to finance for example SHATEC s fully-owned premises (in Bukit Batok). The owners took an interest in the lease terms they are real estate people they are in a strong position to make good decisions. They were also committed to use some of the association s funds to revamp Recipes (the one restaurant which has been renovated twice since 2006) and upgrade the kitchens. With owners on board students would always have a place in owners hotels for their internships. There s more buy-in from them said Mrs Ee-Tan. Developing Hospitality Talent There s been tremendous growth during the past decade with more and more institutes offering hospitality programmes both in Thailand and the region. It will be a great challenge to operate programmes in hospitality successfully. - Ms Veera Pardpattanapanich Rector Dusit Thani College Thailand Mr Alan Palmer in a practical assessment s t ere still a nee THE choice of where one could go to study hospitality and tourism courses at any level has been magnified many times over since the turn of this decade. The five polytechnics in Singapore and the Institute of Technical Education (ITE) offer hospitality-related courses. These are statesubsidised institutions and are able to set up large and sophisticated facilities with state funding. Polytechnics especially attract the better schoolleavers today. Then there are the independent private-owned centres institutes owned by industry associations and academies set up by hotel groups. Regional and international training schools also market heavily to Asian students. Together they all compete for a pool of Millennials and compounding the challenge not or SHA to a because I believe in it. As we turn the page to write the next chapter for SHATEC I am confident that our dedicated team of staff together with its larger community of students and alumni as well as support from the industry will carry the school to new heights. True to its roots as an industry school a school that is by the industry and for the industry SHATEC has done extremely well over the years. Our testament lies squarely on the numerous success stories of SHATEC alumni who are now holding key management positions in the industry. SHATEC s unwavering focus on quality education has also stood it in good stead amidst more competition from an increasing number of private hospitality schools. Unlisted Collection s Mr Loh also Vice-President of the SHATEC believes the need for SHATEC is greater than ever. 41 many of these young people want to join the industry (see next chapter on Developing future hoteliers the journey continues). Said Ms Veera Pardpattanapanich Rector Dusit Thani College Thailand There has been tremendous growth during the past decade with more and more institutes offering hospitality programmes both in Thailand and the region. It will be a great challenge to operate programmes in hospitality successfully. It begs the question is there actually a need for SHATEC today Should SHA still be doing actual training through SHATEC or should it let its legacy of helping to build future hoteliers end here and focus on industry issues Said Mr Albert Teo CEO of Amara Holdings Limited & Chairman of SHATEC I am deeply committed to growing the SHATEC brand simply Developing Hospitality Talent Students learning the theoretical aspects of hotel management Singapore is going through an economic restructuring and we have seen a serious manpower crunch resulting from more hotel and restaurant openings. At the same time the government is lowering the foreign manpower ratio. This means the industry must train many more locals while ensuring the current workforce is upgraded in order for them to be more productive. SHATEC s great and continuing advantage is our close links to the industry. Because we are owned by and work for SHA and the hotel industry at large we have direct access to our members know in great detail what their needs are and provide for these training needs quickly. This agility and responsiveness means SHATEC is best-placed to meet the industry s needs. Currently the industry s biggest needs are for trained rank-and-file staff supervisors and department heads and for continuing education for existing staff said Mdm Kuok. SHATEC is on the right track with its diploma 42 and CET (Continuing Education Training) types of programmes she said. SHATEC has a bluechip name in the region thanks to Pakir but it s a different market today. We have to keep up with the competition by constantly enhancing the courses and giving quality teaching. But this being the Asian travel century with Asian chains Shangri-La including proving Asia could be the best in world shouldn t SHA carve a bigger vision for SHATEC as a world-class hospitality institute and one that offers degree courses to attract better qualified school-leavers Mdm Kuok said Look at the Justin Queks the Eric Teos of our industry they are all SHATEC graduates. They may not be your straight A s students but their passion and the training they got put them at the top of their profession today. This is a service industry not medical law or engineering. EQ is the most important. One of SHATEC s many high-flyers Mr Arthur Kiong CEO Far East Hospitality Management recalled that many of his colleagues were excited Hospitality institutions play a very important role in our tourism eco-system particularly in grooming talent and inspiring young minds. For the past three decades SHATEC s innovative hands-on and industry-ready curriculum continues to nurture and equip a strong pool of hospitality professionals and leaders with the necessary knowledge and skills. For Singapore to succeed in its longterm journey towards quality tourism we will be looking to these young talents to be our future thought leaders to not just create unique experiences for increasingly discerning travellers but also chart the path of sustainable growth. - Ms Neeta Lachmandas Board Member of SHATEC and Assistant Chief Executive of the Singapore Tourism Board Business Development Group Developing Hospitality Talent Students at the Mount Sophia campus upon graduating as they had the resources to articulate to higher education with the SHATEC diploma. But this (the higher diploma) was all I had and a job at Westin (now Swissotel The Stamford). Through the years I ve competed with the best with it. If it s served me well it would serve you well. An MBA is not going to magically make you smarter and better. You are what you are it s how you apply yourself and your skills to the industry said Mr Kiong. Mr Loh added The vocational skills necessary in our industry are no less important and SHATEC does this uniquely well and we are not ashamed to declare this. We also continue to manage a very large number of diploma and higher diploma students and have many Singaporeans choosing our courses over that of the state schools despite the disparity in tuition fees. This is not a level playing field and SHATEC must learn to thrive in this environment. If we cannot be on an equal footing with the state schools then we must occupy our own niche. Mr Loh said this fired up SHA even more to make SHATEC the region s premier hospitality school. SHATEC already has a good reputation regionally but we have not yet reached our goal of regional excellence and that is something for us to strive for. I do not think we are content to just survive and be self-sustaining. We definitely want to be the best in the region and continue to do the hospitality industry in Singapore proud. Given the commitment of everyone at SHA and SHATEC and given the growth of the industry we have a promising future. I care about SHATEC because I see how much the teachers and instructors care about their roles and how much commitment everyone there put into their jobs. Our students alumni and instructors all care about SHATEC and its mission and the hotel industry takes a great interest in its future. SHATEC was the pioneer and virtually all the other schools set up since have a core of SHATEC instructors and alumni running them. This speaks about SHATEC s pioneer status and the continuing influence we have in the industry. - Mr Loh Lik Peng Founder Director Unlisted Collection and Vice Chairman SHATEC 43 Developing Hospitality Talent Industry workshops for hoteliers anging it t e ti es SINCE it started in 1 983 SHATEC s USP has always been to put the Singapore hotel industry s needs above everything else. Today with the reduction of S-passes in the front-facing areas of hotels such as reception restaurant bar and kitchen roles that are filled by foreign labour from the Philippines Malaysia China and other countries in the region Singapore hotels are left with a gaping hole of able bodies who really are the pillars that lift their operation and brand promise. Mr Patrick Imbardelli CEO Pan Pacific Hotels Group (PPHG) Culinary students in the 1 990s a people industry for nothing) is now a bigger issue to attract talent as it is at real odds with the desire of Millennials for a work-life balance. Mr Abid Butt CEO Banyan Hotels and Resorts recalled an encounter with a student When I was in Hawaii we used to bring in interns and we would talk to them. There was this young man from college learning about the industry so I asked him how are you liking it do you see yourself being a GM that sort of thing. He said listen I wouldn t do your job if you gave me a million bucks. I really had to take a deep breath Mr Butt said with a laugh. His expectations coming into our company were different. The industry has to adapt we have to deliver the work-life balance. Hotels are also recognising that Millennials will not take kindly to the traditional hotel career progression which is arduous to say the least. Said Mr Butt The younger generation has access to massive amounts of information and are used to multi-tasking. They would do their homework text a friend and listen to the iPod all at the same time. That s not how I grew up but Job enlargement multi-skilling and raising staff productivity are therefore the imperatives as hotels tackle today s manpower crunch. We compete not just with one another for people to fill these roles but with other sectors such as retail and events. If you look at the growth of the retail and hospitality industries in Singapore the number of jobs is increasing four to five per cent a year but the workforce is increasing only by two per cent said Mr Patrick Imbardelli CEO Pan Pacific Hotels Group (PPHG). On top of that hotels recognise that the nature of a career in the industry long hours 24 7 self-sacrificing (you work when others are having fun) emotionally-draining (it is not called Mr Abid Butt CEO Banyan Hotels & Resorts 44 Developing Hospitality Talent Students at Recipes - a bistro by SHATEC preparing at a Chefs Table that s how they learn. If you put them to check people in check them out it will drive them up the wall because it is a very narrow scope. So broad-banded jobs are what we have to look at because those require multi skills and give people the opportunity to explore different positions in a hotel so they don t get bored. Hotel training and education has to embrace these new needs. Ms Margaret Heng Executive Director of SHA and Chief Executive of SHATEC said the institute would be looking into implementing programmes that bundle related skills together so that the job scope could be expanded. Today it is no longer enough for a say concierge to do just concierge duty. That function is located in the front office so perhaps the concierge could gain more front office skills and learn to check in a guest especially now with the iPad making it easier for staff to be on the move and not just stationed behind the reception counter. So one vertical we could do is to equip the front office executive to take on various roles such as checking-in checking-out guests and performing concierge duties as well. Another vertical could be to enable an F&B service executive to do more where a waiter no longer just waits his skills expanded to cashiering banqueting etc. A third vertical is that of a housekeeping executive who is trained to not just make beds only but also to perform other duties in the rooms division. And if a person wants to do all three verticals we could offer a horizontal programme for hospitality associate. But Ms Heng said training and education was just the beginning hotels had to ensure graduates remain in the industry and progress in it. We understand that a lot of graduates from hospitality schools do not remain in the industry. SHATEC on the contrary has seen otherwise a lot more of our graduates stay on with the industry and many of them are helming top positions. Two things must happen the industry must change its mindset it can no longer expect a person who has a diploma or a degree to start from a low level and keep him there for a long while before he progresses to the next level and the next. If you cannot give people the height to go up give them the breadth. With more responsibilities compensation could also rise. Internet and mobile technology have revolutionised the way hotels operate and market themselves. If our students are not educated on how technology changes can impact operations marketing and improve how hotels could better interact with their guests they will just be learning how to operate the hotel of the past as opposed to hotel of the future. - Mrs Diana Ee-Tan Chairman Academic and Examination Advisory Council SHATEC and SHATEC Board Member The second thing is the industry needs to expose staff through overseas stints in sister properties which it is not doing enough and understandably so due to the manpower shortage. All these will help keep staff challenged and interested Ms Heng said. Mr Butt said Banyan Tree Hotels and Resorts was probably the only hotel company that moved staff at line level to different countries. Typically that would not be practised but you do need to develop and expose people to different challenges. 45 46 Photo courtesy of Marina Bay Sands Developing Hospitality Talent Developing Hospitality Talent Developing future hoteliers t e o rne contin es A problem time immemorial Millennials are from Mars How the industry is changing So you want to be a hotelier Look ma a real rainbow 4 7 PART FOUR Developing Hospitality Talent Developing future hoteliers t e o rne contin es THE hotel industry is facing its worst-ever staff crunch. Lots of new rooms are coming online but few trained staff are available and hotels are not exactly first choice for a real career. Hoteliers increasingly worried are looking at training broadening job scopes and other productivity measures. This book began in the early 80 s with the above paragraph and fast forward to three decades later nothing has changed for the hotel industry. In fact while the Singapore hotel sector then was clamouring for 18 000 warm bodies to man an additional 13 500 rooms that figure seems laughable today in the broader context of Asia s hotel manpower crunch. Marriott International alone needs 36 000 new staff in Asia as it works towards a target of at least 265 hotels in the region by 2016 (as of October 31 2012). The Accor group now recruits and trains 20 000 people a year to operate its 500 hotels in Asia-Pacific (as of December 31 2012) and 700 hotels by 2015. Starwood Hotels & Resorts which will have 320 hotels in Asia by 201 (as of 4 September 20 2012) also needs thousands of people. In all the travel and tourism industry in Asia will face a shortfall of eight million travel and tourism jobs in the next 10 years with the crunch expected to be most acute at managerial levels (source Singapore Tourism Board s Asia Travel Leaders Summit 2012 summary). The supply of hotel managers in 2021 for instance would not even be able to meet half the expected demand said the summary. Leaders who deliberated the topic at the summit acknowledged companies had not grown their organisational capabilities quickly enough to cater to rapidly-evolving demands and new segments in Asia s tourism industry. The conclusion was businesses must start accelerating the development of nextgeneration leaders now to support future business growth. Without doubt travel and tourism in Asia has grown tremendously and is still charging on thanks to a rising middle-class from Indonesia to India vastly-improved accessibility with the advent of low-cost and regional carriers and a boom in hotel construction. STR Global shows that as of January 2013 Asia Pacific has a hotel development pipeline of 1 810 hotels totalling 391 002 rooms. These include projects in construction final planning and planning stages but exclude those in pre-planning stage. Among the countries in the region China has the largest pipeline with 134 631 rooms in construction in January 2013. Significant numbers of rooms are also being built in India (25 709 rooms) Indonesia (1 1 712 rooms) the Philippines (7 242 rooms) and Malaysia (6 910 rooms). The competition for talent has crossed geographical boundaries. Said PPHG s Mr Imbardelli I remember being at a roundtable recently and someone asked Where are the best Singapore leaders of the hotel industry The answer China. So many Singaporeans are working outside Singapore now partly because they are Mandarin-speaking. The capable Singapore hotel leader and his family now have more international experience and are not eager to come back in a hurry Mr Imbardelli added. 48 Developing Hospitality Talent A pro le ti e i e orial The future hospitality professionals WITH Gen X Singapore hoteliers now being a great export the question of who will succeed them in Singapore is back on the table again. A study by Singapore-based Duxton Consulting released October 2012 confirmed what the industry already knew Singapore Gen Y ers i.e. those born from the mid-80 s are in their 20 s and are part of the fastest-growing segment of the workforce globally do not usually want to join the travel and hospitality industry. Mr Laurenz Koehler Managing Partner Duxton Consulting Duxton Consulting. They need to feel they are constantly moving forward mastering new challenges making an impact being recognised for their results and they want everything immediately. By contrast Millennials perceive that the industry Does not pay well and thus does not need people with smarts or talent Offers work that is mostly of low status Does not communicate a professional image unlike administrative or managerial jobs where the work is performed in offices Does not value education and skills. Based on 20 in-depth 90-minute interviews aimed at understanding 18-24 year-olds workrelated goals and psychological drivers along with data from more than 200 quantitative surveys the study found a fundamental gap between what young people in Singapore want and what travel and hospitality industries provide. Millennials (what Gen Y ers are also labelled as) have tremendous self-belief and drive said Mr Laurenz Koehler Managing Partner Ouch. But isn t that a fair perception Said Mr Koehler I don t think this reflects the reality of the industry. The travel industry requires brains and talent and hence offers well-paid and high-status jobs 49 Developing Hospitality Talent It s true in Singapore that young people do not want to join the industry but not true elsewhere in the region Thailand the Philippines Indonesia Myanmar Vietnam etc. - Mr Chanin Donavanik CEO Dusit Thani Hotels & Resorts Hands-on training for hotel management students as most other service industries do. The issue is that the perception is stuck at the low-end of the market Millennials don t see a clear path to progress nor how to move up the ladder. Even if their perception is the reality and the entry-level jobs are hard and low-paying Millennials would put up with it if they see a light at the end of the tunnel. But they don t see this and perceive the entire industry as low-paying and thus are not interested in it. Asked how the industry ended up with Millennials perceiving it does not value education and skills Mr Koehler said Firstly Millennials perception of low educational skills is built by interacting mainly with the lower-end personnel of travel and tourism. Secondly Millennials are self-confident... but face problems adjusting to the reality of entry-level jobs tackling simple challenges and fitting into a job scope they feel is undervaluing their skills. Training and education plays a huge part in attracting Millennials but this is only if the training is meaningful within the Millennials own progression and momentum. Training and education must lead to something concrete. Millennials are quick to judge and dismiss training efforts if they are not perceived to be relevant for their own 50 advancement vs. company-relevant skills (for example compliance specific job processes) said Mr Koehler. Hospitality CEOs including Mr Giovanni Angelini former Shangri-La Hotels & Resorts CEO and Mr Chanin Donavanik CEO Dusit Thani Hotels & Resorts said more than the other Asian countries Singapore had always been faced with the issue of attracting talent. Said Mr Chanin It s true in Singapore that young people do not want to join the industry but not true elsewhere in the region Thailand the Philippines Indonesia Myanmar Vietnam etc. Ms Chua explained that one reason could be that Singapore was small and the chance of serving a neighbour or a younger cousin could be a face-loss issue. As well unlike many other countries Singapore s hotel industry does not have a college population to tap on ie students who work part-time to fund their studies get used to the industry in the process and aren t at all demoralised should that neighbour turn up. Parents here would rather pay their kids to focus on their studies than to have them work part-time in hotels said Ms Chua. Student interacting with guests at Recipes - a bistro by SHATEC Developing Hospitality Talent SHATEC freshmen bonding over bowling games illennials are ro ACTUALLY the hotel industry is not alone in feeling that Millennials are from Mars. Boston Consulting Group s (BCG) latest annual survey of 4 500 companies around the world shows that leadership and talent development is the issue that is top-of-mind for CEOs globally. It s what they are most worried about and also the issue they feel they have the least capability to manage. Mr Vish Jain who heads BCG s new global centre for leadership and talent based in Singapore said the concern stemmed from the whole retirement of baby-boomers (those born after WWII 1 7-1 94 955) by 2015 or so the shift to the next generation of leaders who are in their 45-50-year-olds who in turn are managing Millennials raised in the Internet age. ars There are entire societies where people don t even like a job structure. They are freelancers this whole acceptance I get my work dayto-day and surviving on that. It is this whole shrinking of time frames in the minds and their ability to take risks. I would be terrified not knowing where my next month salary is coming from but these guys are able to take that kind of risk. - Mr Vish Jain head Boston Consulting Group (BCG) Said Mr Jain Now there are entire societies where people don t even like a job structure. They are freelancers this whole acceptance I get my work day-to-day and survive on that. It is this whole shrinking of time frames in the minds and their ability to take risks. I would be terrified not knowing where my next month salary is coming from but these guys are able to take that kind of risk. It is not as if they are not getting hired or retained. It is not as if they are not intelligent. In fact they are smarter than the previous generation. They know the Internet. They learn in high school what we studied in university so the quality is much better. But to engage them keep them focused interested energised motivated challenged recognised accelerated that is what any industry should be doing. Their thinking is I m good at least accelerate me not put impediments in my way let me groom myself and if I can t then it s perfectly within your right to get rid of me but don t tell me there is this long ladder that I have to climb it takes time etc. And you ll see the next people coming in those born in the 90s and all this is amplified. 51 Developing Hospitality Talent Housekeeping training at mockup guestroom Trainer briefing the student chefs Mr Jain disagreed that it was particularly difficult for the hotel industry to attract talent due to its demanding nature and less competitive compensation. It is not specific to hotels. Apart from two or three industries that suck up top talent quickly such as financial services yes even after Lehman consumer goods and consultancy all others compete for talent. In some countries travel and tourism has a good reputation. If you go to Thailand or the Philippines there are decent-sized schools and universities that have travel and tourism programmes. I agree though that in Singapore graduates won t necessarily think of it as first choice. I don t think that salaries are systematically lower in the hotel industry. Again there is a bracket that is attractive from the point of sexiness of job salary etc. Then there s all the rest. The hotel industry falls into all the rest. We have conversations with the engineering industry they suffer as well. Just as they compete for customers companies must realise they need to compete for talent. Mr Jain said they could take the same ideas on engaging the new customers and apply 52 that to employees. Banks for example are now fighting for customers born in the 90s with an entirely new proposition so that these people will stay loyal to them 10 years down the road. OCBC Singapore s Frank is one good example. They design the entire (Frank) banking experience from the ground up based on how the young people think. So the design of the shop does not look like a bank branch at all. It has a massive LCD screen where you can choose the design of your credit card these people are used to choice with the Internet. There is also a lot of online social communication and engagement as well. What companies don t do enough is take the same ideas on the customer side and apply that on the employee side. I m helping a CEO on Gen Y engagement for example how to use Twitter and social media to engage their staff. One finding is they don t trust leaders they are used to corporate scandals. So you ve got to build their trust first on non-work stuff before gradually dropping some work related stuff then withdrawing again. You ve got to orchestrate it completely in a different way. I don t think that salaries are systematically lower in the hotel industry. Again there is a bracket that is attractive from the point of sexiness of job salary etc. Then there s all the rest. The hotel industry falls into all the rest. We have conversations with the engineering industry they suffer as well. - Mr Vish Jain head Boston Consulting Group (BCG) Developing Hospitality Talent Industry professional sharing his wealth of experience with students needs said Mr Imbardelli. As well there is more open-mindedness and sensitivity to Gen Y ers desire to experience different things. I remember working in a hotel and someone in the reception wanted to cross the lobby to F&B. Wow that was a really big thing you had to go see your superior manager personnel Mr Imbardelli recalled. Baby-boomers wait for their boss to come to them and say you re doing a good job so this is where you ll be next. Gen Y ers won t wait they come to you and ask What s next I ve been doing Front Office for seven months. After this I want to go to F&B. I do this for four months then maybe I ll go and work in a resort . Ho t e in str is c anging HOTEL CEOs recognise that their guests and employees are changing faster than their hotels could change bedsheets. On the demand side there is room to redefine any type or category of hotel to cater to new customer needs. Lifestyle-seekers bleasure visitors (business cum pleasure) purpose-driven guests (CSR-aware) glampers (glamourous campers) are but just a few jargons that have crept into the industry reflecting its customer evolution. The rise of the non-cookie cutter hotel to cater to these needs is redefining a hotel s internal spaces and in turn the operation and job scopes of employees. When PPHG designed its new hotel in Singapore the Parkroyal on Pickering it had in mind both job flexibility and seamless guest experience said Mr Imbardelli. We designed the hotel for efficiency. Instead of the traditional here s the all-day dining here s the speciality restaurant that s the bar there there is just one large F&B area and everyone can do everything from hosting the guest to serving clearing tables serving drinks cashiering etc. We just did more training and defined the profile of the staff we wanted i.e. open-minded and energetic. What this does is shorten the learning and make the climb-up less laborious than before. Traditionally we kind of tell the employee Joe you are going to do this for six months get it right then we evaluate next we want you to do this. This is not what Gen Y ers want. There is also more open dialogue on career paths between staff and the hotel and rather than the old picture of HR facilitating transfers and promotions that responsibility has shifted to managers as being on the floor managers would know better what a staff desires. At PPHG the HR function is now more focused on training He could well end up as hotel owner of the future. Banyan Tree Hotels and Resorts Mr Butt who was with Host Hotels US before joining Banyan as CEO last year observed the industry in Asia would be changing its hierarchies a lot more now. Said Mr Butt Markets like North America or Europe have had to consolidate the hierarchies and achieve greater productivity for no other reason than necessity labour cost is a huge issue. They ve had no choice but to start earlier and are ahead in multi-skilling and broadbanded jobs. We have to catch up. It is going to happen because that s what the Gen Y ers want and it also makes us more productive. From a guest s perspective it s fantastic he deals only with one person who practically does everything for him checks him in takes him to the room makes restaurant reservations etc. Our resort hosts already do this. In the (newly-opened) Banyan Tree Shanghai On The Bund we are taking that to the next level where the role is so crossfunctional a guest truly will be with just one individual from pre-arrival to post-departure. 53 Developing Hospitality Talent Mr Wong Hong Kuan CEO Singapore Workforce Development Agency (WDA) agreed the hospitality sector in Singapore had been lagging behind many countries in productivity. Investment in training thus has become even more paramount to help workers become more efficient and productive. Training workers with a wide spectrum of skills will enable them to multi-task and be cross-deployed. This will not only help raise productivity it will also increase customer satisfaction as these workers are empowered to make decisions and respond to customers needs on-the-spot. Some of the skills in demand for workers in the hospitality sector include communication creative thinking customer service problemsolving time management and teamwork. At the management level branding revenue management understanding social media and customer segmentation are key competencies. The Singapore Workforce Skills Qualifications (WSQ) framework offers courses in many of these areas said Mr Wong. WDA s appointed CET Centres such as SHATEC are pivotal in addressing these skill gaps as they provide quality training in these areas he added. With the support and expertise of SHATEC the hospitality sector has been able to attract new talent to join the sector and at the same time train existing workers with relevant skills to progress in their careers and contribute to the company s growth. Asked how WDA will further support the industry s manpower needs he said WDA had appointed another five CET Centres including SHATEC to provide structured training and progression pathway for workers to upgrade their skills and cross-train with courses under the Tourism and or Food and Beverage (F&B) Workforce Skills Qualifications (WSQ) frameworks. These centres will also help draw new talent into the hospitality sector train and place them into hospitality jobs. Mr Wong Hong Kuan CEO Singapore Workforce Development Agency (WDA) Besides training companies should also look at improving their workplaces in order to attract and retain back-to-work locals as well as mature workers. WDA has launched the WorkPro scheme which helps employers redesign jobs and implement good work-life strategies such as flexible work arrangements he said. So o ant to e a otelier Mr Loh Lik Peng Founder Director Unlisted Collection Singapore Careers in hospitality put a huge premium on good people skills and experience and you rise to the top because over time these skills shine through. Schools give you the training and framework to start you on the right path and after that it s all up to the individual. I do think the schools in Singapore do the skills part very well and it s perhaps the personality part and the aptitude part that are the most difficult. IT takes a special person to be a hotelier. Here are a few soundbites from CEOs on who s ideal for the job Mr Abid Butt CEO Banyan Tree Hotels & Resorts Singapore I must confess our industry is a very demanding one because when everybody goes out for nice dinners we have to take care of them. It is a 24 7 industry. Our emotions go up and down based on the people we re dealing be they colleagues clients or guests and that s an emotional roller-coaster that happens all day long. There are people who can t cope with that kind of environment. So we have to find the right people to join the industry because it is 54 an exciting industry. Which industry enables you to be with somebody from Germany Ireland Hong Kong Singapore all in one day the world is literally at your feet. For people who like dealing with people that s fantastic. You can also travel to different parts of the world because tourism is universal and with the rise of emerging markets there are new opportunities. The compensation might not seem a lot at entry level but as you grow you will be compensated well. Developing Hospitality Talent Mr Michael Issenberg COO and Chairman Accor Asia-Pacific Singapore It s very individual. I have a 1 9-year-old son. He could end up in hospitality he might not. It is a lot of hard work but it is also a real people industry. If you want to sit behind computer design an algorithm for Google it s not the industry for you. But if you actually like people it s for you and as your career develops you will do different things. It s fun you re always meeting people it s team-oriented so you develop great relationships. And once people get a taste for that they love it. I stepped out of industry once for 18 months and I missed it. That happens a lot. Mr Kurt Rufli Former CEO Amari Hotels & Resorts Thailand Behind every beautiful meal every beautiful moment in a country away from home is a hotelier a chef a restaurateur... They love to create beautiful things with their imagination and their hands. If you are academic go to the university. If you like to create beautiful things go to hotel school. And today real craftsmanship is gaining deep respect all over again. oo a a real rain o exotic world. Finally for the first time we re seeing the phenomenon of what I call the rainbow tourism people of all colours not only white but yellow brown black even pink people of all gender age and colour travelling all around the world in a totally unprecedented manner. And that s not only changing our industry in terms of how we have to deal with guests but more importantly changing our industry in how we deal with our own talent base. The implication of rainbow tourism is not just Chinese people eating Chinese food in Paris it s much more than that the opportunity for young people to aspire to be a GM today for instance is 10 times more than 20 years ago when the GM would have to always be a Caucasian because of the guest mix. THE future for young Asians to rise to the top of this industry has never been shinier. That s not a hope it s a reality and it s one of the monumental changes that will help change the mindset of young people (and their skeptical parents) of the industry. Mr Ho Kwon Ping chairman Banyan Tree Hotels and Resorts could not sum the reasons more eloquently For the first time in 150 years there is truly a global sea-change in the industry an entire paradigm shift. Global tourism had been characterised by a uni-directional flow with guests basically of one colour largely Western-developed countries sending guests to the rest of the Mr Ho Kwon Ping Chairman Banyan Tree Hotels & Resorts This is the time Asian travel leaders have to be thought leaders for their industry. Look to 20 years later and beyond What do we want to do that will affect the lives of Asian people 20 years from now and transform this entire industry It s an exciting time to be in tourism. 55 Developing Hospitality Talent 56 Developing Hospitality Talent The Graduate Made in SHATEC And how they made it PART FIVE 57 Developing Hospitality Talent The Graduate WHAT is the profile of a SHATEC graduate They are not straight A s students. They typically have personality. And many have the X factor that is necessary to smash the glass ceiling in the industry EQ people skills call it whatever which is why so many of them have risen to top posts in the hotel industry in Singapore and the region and in service-related industries such as hospitals and banking. SHATEC was their baptism of fire as the training and education was designed to prepare them for the real world of working in hotels. A New Nation headline Students find hotel course tough-going reported the first batch of the higher diploma students as saying the course was too intensive and they had to learn too much in too short a time. To which Mr Pakir Singh former Executive Director of SHA and CEO SHATEC retorted to the reporter The time factor is not a complaint. It is a statement of fact. It is part of the training. The capacity to respond under pressure is part of management training. This all-round training said Ascott Centre for Excellence Vice President Mr Willie Ong prepared students for other industries not just hotels. Former SHA Deputy Executive Director and SHATEC Assistant Chief Executive Ms Teo Poh Kheam recalled that each student was interviewed before they could join the school. We didn t just take anyone. For chefs we looked more for the artisan passion. For service and front office their outgoingness personality and serviceoriented nature. For leaders we looked at leadership qualities and the ambition to go far. The students were vocal. They were not straight A s students but they spoke well. As in any school there were the good the bad and the naughty ones. Mr Derrick Lee who was with SHATEC from 1 984 to 2006 and is now President International Bartenders Association said The students were very enthusiastic and eager to learn more than what was taught. You could not feel bored as they always inspired you to update yourself so as to pass on the knowledge to them. Some students would cry when they did not perform a particular task correctly. The motivation to excel was clearly displayed. And that in essence was what they called the SHATEC spirit . 58 Developing Hospitality Talent Made in SHATEC Thousands of SHATEC graduates have risen to the top of their profession. Here are a few of them and how they got there. The students were very enthusiastic and eager to learn more than what was taught. You could not feel bored as they always inspired you to update yourself so as to pass on the knowledge to them. Some students would cry when they did not perform a particular task correctly. The motivation to excel was clearly displayed. International Bartenders Association 1. Mr Nikheel Advani Chief Operating Officer and Principal Grace Bay Resorts Turks & Caicos Islands 2. Ms Monica Alsagoff Senior Vice President Weber Shandwick Singapore 3. Mr Ignatius Chan Founder Iggy s Singapore 4. Mr Richard Chan General Manager DoubleTree Chongqing Wanzhou China 5. Mr Cheong Hai Poh Executive Assistant Manager Conrad Centennial Singapore 6. Mr Ronald Kang General Manager Park Hyatt Beijing China 7 Mr Tony Khoo Executive Chef . Marina Mandarin Singapore 8. Mr Arthur Kiong CEO Far East Hospitality Management Singapore 9. Mr Frankson Lee General Manager InterContinental Beijing Financial Street China 10. Ms Jessica Lee Senior Director Corporate Relations McDonald s Singapore 1 Mr Lim Hwee Peng CSW FWS 1. International Wine Specialist Winecraft Marketing & Services Singapore 12. Ms Jeane Lim General Manager Copthorne King s Hotel Singapore 13. Mr Nicholas Lim President-Asia The Travel Corporation 1 Mr Danny Lingham General Manager 4. Fraser Suites Chengdu China 15. Mr Kellvin Ong Project Director South Beach Hotel & Club Singapore 16. Mr Willie Ong Vice President Ascott Centre for Excellence Singapore 1 . Mr Pang Kok Keong Chef Owner 7 Sugar Daddy Group Singapore 18. Mr Pek Chin Siong Executive Director Hotel Operations Marina Bay Sands Singapore 1 Mr Justin Quek Director QBS Dining 9. Concepts and Principal Chef Sky on 57 Marina Bay Sands Singapore 20. Mr Philip Cyril Raj General Manager Bay Hotel Singapore 22. Mr Bernard Rodrigues General Manager The Charterhouse Causeway Bay Hong Kong 22. Mr Eric Teo Culinary Consultant ET Culinary Arts Singapore 23. Mr Edmund Toh Assistant Vice President Culinary Operations Food & Beverage Resorts World Sentosa and President Singapore Chefs Association - Mr Derrick Lee President 59 Developing Hospitality Talent And how they made it Mr Nikheel Advani Chief Operating Officer and Principal Grace Bay Resorts Turks & Caicos Islands Describe your job and what you like about it. experience. Here is what one of my mentors told me In your 20 s it is all about experience. Volunteer and be proactive in getting any additional experience in the business that you can even if it doesn t pay well. In your 30 s it is all about position. Grow within your department and be exposed to as many positions within the business in an upward accent within the organisation until you reach the top. In your 40 s it is all about making money and achieving results through your team members. In your 50 s it is time to give back to the community to the industry to your country and leave a legacy So far this advice has been invaluable to my success How did you find your job calling and what does it take to rise to the top I was planning to be an engineer and at the age of 16 my father had a heart-to-heart conversation with me about the value of money how he was rich and I was not and I had to go out and earn my living . He was generous though he said I could stay at home and he would pay for any education that I qualified for anywhere in the world. While I was studying engineering I did private catering for European embassies and worked at luxury hotels as a banquet waiter bartender and dishwasher in the stewarding departments. It was an amazing experience and I just loved it serving banquet Chinese dinners taking care of VIPs at the embassies mixing cocktails at weddings and dishwashing till the wee hours of the morning with a diverse team. A year went by and I sat down with my folks and told them that I loved this work more than engineering and I wanted to pursue a professional career in this industry. They were both supportive and in July 1 989 I joined the F&B programme at SHATEC. It changed my life and gave me the solid foundation to build upon and made me the leader I am today. This foundation hard work and great mentors were the secrets of my success. 60 Each day I have the opportunity to work with a super talented team in creating excellence be it in exceptional service delivery or reducing the carbon footprint and improving the ecological environment around us. In my role as Chief Operating Officer and Principal I oversee overall operation branding sales & marketing and resort development of Grace Bay Resorts. I joined Grace Bay Club in August 2004 as Managing Director and served as the top operational executive in the expansion and renovation of Grace Bay Club as it evolved from a US 15 million 21-room boutique hotel to a full-service luxury resort boasting 82 suites and residences (200 plus bedrooms) now valued at over USD 250 million. I was also responsible for the successful opening of the US 100 million Veranda Resort & Residences in February 2010 a property managed by Grace Bay Resorts. Your funniest or most memorable training moment at SHATEC What s your mantra 1. Always have a vision if you don t know where you are going you are not going to get there 2. Work hard and work smart you need both to get to the top 3. Always take time to praise your team members who give it their best shot you will be surprised at the quantum leap in performance. What s your advice to young graduates Always have great mentors throughout your whole career. There are leaders who take a personal interest in your growth and provide guidance and wisdom through their years of We had many enjoyable times at SHATEC. We were an outgoing and gregarious batch One day during our practical session in the training restaurant and I was Head Waiter that day I did a final walkthrough and found small marks on the gueridon trolley. I asked one of the students in that section to give it a final polish. He immediately got a bottle of Brasso and began to shake it up prior to use. Lo and behold the cap was not screwed on properly and Brasso sprayed all over the restaurant. It was comical for a moment and we were all stunned in disbelief. Then we realised we had a short time to clean up the mess and worked doubly hard to reset the restaurant. With great team work we managed to open the doors a few minutes after the proposed time. One thing we learn in our industry is that a crisis may pop up at any time we need to stay cool work together and find an effective solution forward. Developing Hospitality Talent Ms Monica Alsagoff Senior Vice President Weber Shandwick Singapore How did you find your true job calling and what does it take to rise to the top What s your advice for young graduates Have passion integrity and a positive attitude in whatever you endeavour these are the three essential ingredients that will pave your future in both your work and personal life. It s important to believe in yourself and passion is key. Keep challenging yourself don t be afraid to ask when you are unsure and always have fun in your job. One of the funniest moments was during my internship at a hotel and I was shucking oysters at the fine dining restaurant. This was a skill I had proudly mastered. However at one of my attempts one stubborn oyster flew over the oyster bar and landed squarely onto the lap of a guest I was fortunate to be exposed to various jobs in different departments from operations to sales within one hotel. My true calling didn t come easy as my attempts to transfer to the hotel s Public Relations Department proved futile. At the interview I was told I was not suitable for PR. I decided to take a career risk left the hospitality industry and joined a public relations consultancy which was the start of my delightful journey into the world of public relations 21 years ago. Your funniest or most memorable training moment at SHATEC Describe your job and what you like about it. I m responsible for strengthening my firm s portfolio of clients in consumer lifestyle and sports marketing and in driving regional campaigns across the South-east Asia region. I enjoy the diversity of projects and industries. Besides working with luxury and lifestyle clients I get the opportunity to manage corporate government and sports marketing (clients) doing everything from their branding to promotional planning from ambassador engagement to influencer messaging. Playing chef was probably my most memorable training moment at SHATEC. My first experience cooking in the kitchen for paying customers at our school restaurant on Nassim Hill was certainly an experience to remember. We had such fun times working and learning with my SHATEC team mates. One of the funniest moments was during my internship at a hotel and I was shucking oysters at the fine dining restaurant. This was a skill I had proudly mastered. However at one of my attempts one stubborn oyster flew over the oyster bar and landed squarely onto the lap of a guest What s your mantra Work smart. Play hard. 61 Developing Hospitality Talent Mr Ignatius Chan Founder Iggy s Singapore How did you find your job calling and what does it take to rise to the top success will come naturally. Remember success is relative there is no absolute benchmark for success. One step at a time. Be patient stay humble and success will come naturally. Remember success is relative there is no absolute benchmark for success. I was inspired by a mini TV series Jeffrey Archer s Kane and Abel in 1 985. I had just started working as a waiter at the Goodwood Park Hotel Singapore. Seeing how Abel rose from a dining room waiter to a hotel magnate created some fantasy in me that someday with a little luck and the right opportunity I could be like Abel. Of course that did not happen but I did become a restaurateur and today I m the proud owner of a world-class restaurant. What did it take to rise to the top Firstly work hard and seize every opportunity to learn. Be adaptable stay relevant and have lots of humility. I am sincere in all my relationships and with my relentless passion for wine and gastronomy I managed to impress a few people who opened the doors for me. Your funniest or most memorable training moment at SHATEC Describe your job and what you like about it. I could not single one out there were so many funny moments. I guess one of the most memorable incidents was when we did our Round Island Dragon Boat Charity Race where I felt a great sense of camaraderie. However we hit a snag when we found during the actual race that the route was much longer than we had plotted as the land reclamation on Jurong Island had added many more kilometres. We were inexperienced exhausted and sun-burnt. What kept us going were the sense of purpose commitment team spirit friendship and of course tenacity unknown to ourselves at that moment. I m responsible for gastronomic creativity wine strategy restaurant service and operation of Iggy s. My wife Janice whom I met at SHATEC manages all matters relating to human resource general administration finance corporate governance and compliance marketing and communications. I enjoy what I do as it gives me direct contact with my guests suppliers and my team. This helps me to be more responsive grounded and better able to strategise our business objectives. What s your mantra If it is something worth keeping it s worth striving for and worth nurturing especially in difficult times. What s your advice for young graduates One step at a time. Be patient stay humble and 62 Developing Hospitality Talent Mr Richard Chan General Manager DoubleTree Chongqing Wanzhou China How did you find your job calling and what does it take to rise to the top What s your advice to young graduates It is never easy to know what you want after you graduate or which department to go to. But remember no venture no gain. I always wanted to be either in teaching or the hotel line when I was young. I did relief teaching after my NS then Westin came calling wanting to sponsor candidates for the three-year diploma course at SHATEC. I told the then director of human resource Mr Tan Eng Leong I was a raw diamond waiting to be polished Getting to when I am took a lot of hard work and working smart. My base has been primarily China although I have also worked in Ho Chin Minh City and Kuala Lumpur. Communication with both owners and staff whatever levels they are is important. Along the way I did a number of courses with AHMA and Cornell. It is never easy to know what you want after you graduate or which department to go to. But remember no venture no gain. Your funniest or most memorable training moment at SHATEC A few of us sneaked into school after office hours and spent the night there for the exams the next day. We were in the kitchen lab and raided the fridge as we mugged for the exams. Too late for Mr Pakir or Ms Teo to punish us Describe your job and what you like about it. Right now I am doing another hotel opening for Hilton Worldwide in Chongqing. I have to deal with the project people to ensure the project is on track with the owners to ensure that the opening budget is in line and do pre-opening activities getting the pre-opening office ready recruiting people purchasing etc. It s never ending. What s your mantra Have a positive attitude no matter how bad the situation is. Keeping smiling. 63 Developing Hospitality Talent Mr Cheong Hai Poh Executive Assistant Manager Conrad Centennial Singapore How did you find your true job calling and what does it take to rise to the top in life. Be curious daring and EXPLORE You have a CHOICE to take a CHANCE and make a CHANGE in your life. Play hard work hard strike a good balance in life. Be curious daring and EXPLORE You have a CHOICE to take a CHANCE and make a CHANGE in your life. I guess it has always been a passion for service all along and I enjoy meeting and talking to people from all walks of life. The sense of satisfaction derived when good service is reciprocated with a string of compliments or just simply a smile is priceless. My personal principles are diligence integrity giving focus wisdom self discipline and most of all patience all of which are important attributes for a successful career. Your funniest or most memorable training moment at SHATEC Describe your job and what you like about it. In my current role I assist my hotel GM to oversee the daily hotel operations. What I like about my job is there are always more layers to discover and explore and I always enjoy interacting with people - internal and external guests - on a daily basis. Most memorable training moment was with Mr Pakir Singh former Chief Executive of SHATEC who trained us for Communication Skills. On one occasion Mr Pakir advertently set up an unpleasant scenario to instill fear in all of us. It left a great impact on me and on my cohort who witnessed the entire scene. After that we were given five minutes to pen down our thoughts feelings and emotions experienced during that scene. Mr Pakir Singh s intention was to bring across a point to us that is FEAR creates communication block barrier unknowingly which he had successfully illustrated in reel live action which must be overcome for effective communication. That helped us to realise the essence of good communication skills especially in the service hotel industry where we often meet diverse groups of people and are more susceptible to such displeasing scenarios. What s your mantra Finding comedy in my life as laughter is the best medicine to destress in my opinion. Also a constant reminder to keep a calm mind and an open heart good things would eventually come into my life. That would help me feel better. What s your advice to young graduates Play hard work hard strike a good balance 64 Developing Hospitality Talent Mr Ronald Kang General Manager Park Hyatt Beijing China How did you find your true job calling and what does it take to rise to the top Your funniest or most memorable training moment at SHATEC I was not dressed appropriately for my first interview with the then Westin Singapore which was sponsoring students for enrolment into SHATEC. I wore a T-shirt shorts and slippers (no kidding). I was asked to come back the following day. I asked Why Just come they said. It was an all-night vigil. I turned up the next day wearing a long sleeve shirt tie pants and shoes. Figured it out. Passed the interview and the rest is history. It was accidental. I was not dressed appropriately for my first interview with the then Westin Singapore which was sponsoring students for enrolment into SHATEC. I wore a T-shirt shorts and slippers (no kidding). I was asked to come back the following day. I asked Why Just come they said. It was an all-night vigil. I turned up the next day wearing a long sleeve shirt tie pants and shoes. Figured it out. Passed the interview and the rest is history. Apart from those birthday dunkings at the pool in Nassim Hill campus there were so many memorable moments with practical cooking classes and service at Restaurant SHATEC. Best of all in the first week asked by Mr Pakir to introduce oneself everyone talked about their experience while I talked about my childhood Chinatown and durian-selling stuff. The story was published in the SHATEC magazine... Describe your job and what you like about it I ve been with Hyatt for 22 years. It s my fourth employer only. As general manager of the Park Hyatt Beijing my job is to manage the hotel look after our customers develop our employees and most importantly please our owners. What I like about it is the daily engagement with guests employees and colleagues. The vigour and daily routine of hotel life keeps me youthful and energetic What s your mantra (Those who lack knowledge worry too much those who lack authority angers easily those who lack confidence talks too much.) What s your advice to young graduates Stage 1 (when I first started in and after SHATEC) Listen watch and do. Stage 2 (after a few years) Listen watch do and make mistakes (then ask questions and learn to correct mistakes. DO NOT repeat mistakes if you can help it). Stage 3 (30 years later and at 52 years old) Listen watch do and share the experience and pass it along. 65 Developing Hospitality Talent Mr Tony Khoo Executive Chef Marina Mandarin Singapore How did you find your true job calling and what does it take to rise to the top Your funniest or most memorable training moment at SHATEC I was a coffee boy at a local coffee shop. The satisfaction I got from cooking a dish being recognised for it and the intensity I felt made me realise this was my true calling. It paved the way for a lifetime career. I was a coffee boy at a local coffee shop. The satisfaction I got from cooking a dish being recognised for it and the intensity I felt made me realise this was my true calling. It paved the way for a lifetime career. Success 99 per cent perspiration and one per cent inspiration. My most memorable moment was being awarded Most Outstanding Student of the Year Challenge Shield for Food Preparation 1 984 to1 986 during SHATEC graduation. Describe your job and what you like about it. I oversee the entire kitchen operation of Marina Mandarin. The part I enjoy the most is seeing the younger cooks and chefs eventually rise to be experienced chefs. What s your mantra When the going gets tough the tough gets going. What s your advice to young graduates Success comes only to those who chase their dreams with passion determination and commitment. 66 Developing Hospitality Talent Mr Arthur Kiong CEO Far East Hospitality Management Singapore What s your advice to young graduates Here s my list of advice to young graduates Nobody owns your career but you. You must know your strengths and limitations. Work on your strengths and manage your limitations. In the first few years work for strong brands. It will teach you systems and expose you to good practices. Architect your resume but be careful not to job hop you need to stay a minimum of two years in a company to build credibility and capability. Take on the challenging assignments. Work overseas. Volunteer to do the hard stuff that others are intimidated by. Always look for the strengths in others and make their weaknesses irrelevant. While climbing the ladder to career success never kiss up and kick down. Relationships are important and what goes around comes around. Always perform a level up. Do more than you are paid and you will end up being paid more than what you do. Success is proportionate to your ability to conceptualise your conviction to persuade and your courage to execute. Master all 3Cs. Always question the status quo and challenge yourself to find a better way to achieve the desired outcome. Never make money your primary motivator. Find a better reason. Your funniest or most memorable training moment at SHATEC Always perform a level up. Do more than you are paid and you will end up being paid more than what you do The evening before the cooking exams we were all worried that we would be asked to do Eggs Benedict a dicey execution if given only one chance to poach the egg just right. I thought the clever thing to do is hide a spare raw egg in the kitchen just in case the one given breaks. The next day true enough the egg I was attempting to poach disintegrated into an ugly mess. Never mind I thought I had a spare one. The problem was how to get rid of the spoilt poach egg without getting caught. While I was contemplating this problem holding the steamy messy poached egg on my tochon (dish cloth) the examiner approached. In a panic I instinctively popped it into my mouth. It was &% hot Tears were streaming down my cheeks my tongue singed and I was in excruciating pain as I managed a smile to the examiner s question where s your egg The loud and sudden outburst of laughter from my classmates must have distracted him. To my relief he moved on without waiting for my answer. That s the reason I didn t make it as a chef. How did you find your job calling and what does it take to rise to the top I never started out wanting to be in the hotel business. It s an industry I stumbled into the opportunity was there and I was available. I think life is very much like that even though I am quite the meticulous planner. However as the adage goes Man proposes but God disposes. Many people say follow your dreams do what you love . I learnt to love what I do and as a result lived my dream. Describe your job and what you like about it. My primary responsibilities are to build the brands under Far East Hospitality and grow our business regionally and then globally. I enjoy this immensely because it involves helping everyone around me succeed in what they do. What s your mantra In everything give thanks 67 Developing Hospitality Talent Mr Frankson Lee General Manager InterContinental Beijing Financial Street China How did you find your job calling and what does it take to rise to the top Your funniest or most memorable training moment at SHATEC The most memorable moment was when I was selected as a class representative by Ms Ann Ang. At high school I was never a good student and was never chosen to take on any position. Ms Ang s faith and confidence in me made me realise my inner potential. She was a mentor I remember till now (though she might not remember me). During an overseas trip it was after I had completed my O Level exams I met a friend who was studying at SHATEC and she encouraged me to take up a course there knowing my passion to travel and visit grand hotels. After SHATEC I joined then Le Meridien Hotel Singapore and started my 18-year hotel career. I guess having the right attitude great mentors being at the right place at the right time being always prepared helped me rise to where I am now. The most memorable moment was when I was selected as a class representative by Ms Ann Ang. At high school I was never a good student and was never chosen to take on any position. Ms Ang s faith and confidence in me made me realise my inner potential. She was a mentor I remember till now (though she might not remember me). Describe your job and what you like about it. As a general manager I m basically responsible for the entire success of the hotel. It is also my responsibility to help develop career paths for others and this is what I enjoy the most i.e seeing my colleagues grow. What s your mantra What does not kill you makes you stronger. What s your advice to young graduates Stay focus be humble be ready to work hard and have a positive attitude. 68 Developing Hospitality Talent Ms Jessica Lee Senior Director Corporate Relations McDonald s Singapore How did you find your true job calling and what does it take to rise to the top What s your advice to young graduates There were many funny moments. We used to close the doors leading to the restaurant upstairs early so people would not come up after 9.15 pm (last order 9.30pm) or change the thermostat to freezing point so people would leave. I was fortunate to be a pioneer student in the Higher Diploma in Hotel Management programme. I loved the communications module and true enough after my three-year bond I quickly veered towards the marketing & communications industry. Since I left then Westin in 1 988 I ve built my career in advertising public relations and marketing across many blue-chip companies. Today I am back in the food and beverage business as senior director Corporate Relations and chief of staff to the president of McDonald s Asia-Pacific Middle East Africa. I worked as a chambermaid bartender kitchen aid front desk officer you name it at hotel school. It s all worth it. Now none of my staff can pull the wool over my eyes on any execution detail. So don t be afraid to do things at the bottom of the rung be it to julienne the carrots or to make a bed with hospital corners. Your funniest or most memorable training moment at SHATEC Describe your job and what you like about it. I wear a double-hat at the company. My primary role includes executive communications media government relations issues management accountability for the region s major meetings conventions and conferences. The other part is working as chief of staff to our regional president which involves working closely with him as his through-partner as he works with the country leadership teams on executing the strategic plans. The region covers 37 markets and as you can imagine my responsibilities in total give me a strategic view of the company vision and I really love that. We trained at Nassim Hill then and the SHATEC restaurant was one level up. There were many funny moments. We used to close the doors leading to the restaurant upstairs early so people would not come up after 9.15 pm (last order 9.30pm) or change the thermostat to freezing point so people would leave. But the funniest was when we saw Arthur Kiong and another classmate lift a whole gueridon trolley a heavy table-side flamb cooking station to the narrow upper deck of the restaurant where there were only small tables for two. Our Italian instructor nearly flipped We were supposed to cook from the lower level for guests on the upper deck. When questioned Arthur said But you said tableside service so we thought we should lift the whole trolley up the deck. Cracked us up. What s your mantra I believe in work-life integration. When you operate at a senior level you must strike a harmony between work and life. For me that means working at home when you need it taking a day-off to bake a cake for my kids and always always always making time for facials massages pedicures and manicures. I cannot apologise for these little things to keep me sane. 69 Developing Hospitality Talent Mr Lim Hwee Peng CSW FWS International Wine Specialist Winecraft Marketing & Services Singapore How did you find your job calling and what does it take to rise to the top Describe your job and what you like about it. The beginning started innocently with wine as an academic subject when I was a student of SHATEC s NTC -2 in F&B Operation in 1 991. Be thankful for each day and appreciate the fruit of an honest day s work. Always be grateful to those who have helped you along your way and be humble. After completing the course during my internship at SHATEC I was encouraged to enrol for a professional wine competition the Singapore - Australian Wine Education Award and emerged as a winner. That victory made me realise my strength in the wine department and further ignited my desire to work intensively in that direction. Nevertheless my path to being a wine professional was littered with hurdles. In the early to mid-1 990s prior to the internet era there were limited resources for picking up wine knowhow. Complimentary wine tasting sessions were also few and not as well-organised. To overcome those limitations a few wine geeks and I decided to band together and share resources. We worked part-time at hotels banquet events or at various embassies functions. With the little allowances from those gigs we pooled our money and buy a bottle or two to taste and learn about wine flavours and style. On hindsight I believe my keenness in learning and intense exposure in the trade were the vital factors that helped me rise to my current standing. Our venture WineCraft Marketing & Services targets primarilty trade professionals and entities with corporate sectors being the secondary market. We focus on wine consultancy wine education and being the gatekeeper for wineries and the general wine world. I enjoy the close relationships with our partners and participants of the wine programmes. I also enjoy it if our client s success is partly due to us. For example we have been wine consultants to Tung Lok s flagship restaurant Chinois at Orchard Parade and My Humble House restaurant in Esplanade since 2008. We created a wine list that was duly recognized by the Wine Spectator Awards of Excellence. What s your mantra Work hard play harder and neglect not the body and soul. What s your advice to young graduates Be thankful for each day and appreciate the fruit of an honest day s work. Always be grateful to those who have helped you along your way and be humble. Your funniest or most memorable training moment at SHATEC I enrolled again in SHATEC in 1 994 to study the Higher Diploma in Hotel Management. Some of the best moments involved intense contests with classmates to win the highest academic score athletic events and inter-class soccer tournaments. 70 Developing Hospitality Talent Ms Jeane Lim General Manager Copthorne King s Hotel Singapore How did you find your true job calling and what does it take to rise to the top What s your mantra Build a strong foundation and have good mentors in your working life. Be open to changes and be fair to the company. Be kind to yourself. Being humble honest sincere committed and hardworking may sound a bit old fashion but these values are the best formula. A good sense of humour strong passion for your job and the ability to learn from your mistakes will take you through many stressful situations. Winning the gold award for SHATEC 89 intake and given the opportunity to do a Professional Development Course at Cornell University US encouraged me to pursue my career in the industry. Grand Hyatt Hotel Singapore which sponsored my course gave me a solid foundation in terms of training and international exposure. Millennium & Copthorne International offered me the opportunity to be involved in hotel operations which opens another interesting chapter of my career. I have spent 24 years in the industry 16 years with Grand Hyatt and eight years now with Copthorne King s. I was fortunate to have good mentors they helped me to get to where I am today. A strong passion for my job positive attitude ability to adapt to changing demands and environment good teamwork and keen interest to take up new challenges are fundamental to remain competitive in this industry. Stay positive and motivated in whatever you do. What advice would you give to young graduates Build a strong foundation and have good mentors in your working life. Be open to changes and be fair to the company. Be kind to yourself. Being humble honest sincere committed and hardworking may sound a bit old fashion but these values are the best formula. A good sense of humour strong passion for your job and the ability to learn from your mistakes will take you through many stressful situations. Your funniest or most memorable training moment at SHATEC Challenging group projects especially those assigned by Mr Pakir. We had to dress up as a wayang singer Chinese ghost and many other characters The deadline was tight and we had to do everything from scratch. But we became the best of friends through these sufferings . Describe your job and what you like about it. I am in charge of the hotel operation yield management cost control maintenance human resource and GOP. I have to make important decisions that can assist staff in their career path and their general welfare. I also pilot small charity projects that involve our staff. This is crucial to get ourselves grounded. 71 Developing Hospitality Talent Mr Nicholas Lim President-Asia The Travel Corporation How did you find your job calling and what does it take to rise to the top What s your advice to young graduates Leave your Facebook and Twitter at home read business publications and expand your mind. You are hired based on what you can contribute to the organisation not how popular or how many likes or friends you have. I was just 12 years old and worked as a door boy at a local five-star hotel over Christmas as the management felt it was nice to have young boys greeting guests during the festive season. That vacation job kickstarted my passion for the industry. Once I tried to be an engineer but it was dreadful. So I decided to jumpstart my career in the industry and studied at SHATEC. And when I returned to the industry it felt good and right. Without a doubt it takes hard work to rise to the top but also an on-going desire to excel in whatever you do. In school I was always average academically but I always find a lot of success when I do something I enjoy. This spurs me on to this day. You must constantly have the desire to excel and grow. Leave your Facebook and Twitter at home read business publications and expand your mind. You are hired based on what you can contribute to the organisation not how popular or how many likes or friends you have. Your funniest or most memorable training moment at SHATEC I was asked by one of the training officers to host a class project show and I was so nervous that I forgot the name of my class even when there were only two classes back then A or B. From then I made up my mind to be more confident and comfortable in public speaking. Describe your job and what you like about it. I am responsible for growing the brand across Asia. I travel a lot for work and I meet people from all cultures. It is really interesting to see things from their perspectives. You then need to cut your strategies accordingly and work with the people on the ground. What s your mantra Your people (team) brand and bottomline matter. Everything else is secondary. 72 Developing Hospitality Talent Mr Danny Lingham General Manager Fraser Suites Chengdu China How did you find your true job calling and what does it take to rise to the top What s your mantra Do not be impatient to climb to the top quickly. Instead do your job extremely well always with the guest s experience in mind and the rest will take care of itself. Most importantly enjoy your work and stay positive as 70 per cent of your life is spent in it. If you do not enjoy your work there goes your life and it would be wise to change your job. A hotelier is a person who loves making others happy and basically that s me. I loved my time at SHATEC learning to cook (my parents and siblings thoroughly enjoyed the new dishes I cooked) making cocktails learning about fine-dining and the pairing of wines and food cleaning rooms the function hall and toilets and even changing light bulbs and fixing the plumbing. Rising to the top is not easy. But if you are true to yourself and your team mates have the sole objective of making every guest feel great regardless of the toil it takes on you you will be singled out. There are of course politics and backstabbing it s all part of working life. Just learn to stay clear of it and do not let it affect you. Always maintain a positive outlook in life. Nothing is a problem if there is a solution for it. What s your advice to young graduates Do not be impatient to climb to the top quickly. Instead do your job extremely well always with the guest s experience in mind and the rest will take care of itself. Most importantly enjoy your work and stay positive as 70 per cent of your life is spent on it. If you do not enjoy your work there goes your life and it would be wise to change your job. Your funniest or most memorable training moment at SHATEC Describe your job and what you like about it. During training at our school s restaurant a guest ordered a flamb dish. Fanny Foo our classmate prepared it for him. She had quite a bit of liquor in the pan and the flame was impressive. Everyone went Woah. There was a faint smell of burning and we looked at Fanny s fringe...it was singed (burnt) and she went Oh no I ve been in the service industry since 2004 and currently I manage the Fraser Suites Chengdu. Guests mostly stay a month to two years. They come in as strangers but leave as family. Our associates who run the hotel are also part of the extended family. Often our guests take the whole department out for meals or buy gifts of appreciation for their hard work. Every request is handled immediately and every effort is made to ensure their stay is memorable. I am in the Happy Business. I strive to make my staff guests and owners happy. 73 Developing Hospitality Talent Mr Kellvin Ong Project Director South Beach Hotel & Club Singapore How did you find your job calling and what does it take to rise to the top After spending six years with the Republic of Singapore Navy I was looking to pursue a new career and came across a Hyatt advertisement. When they asked me what position I was looking for I immediately replied front office manager I didn t know what it took to be one. They offered me a position of front desk clerk. The beauty is you get to tailor the type of hotel you want to see in operation like building your own Lego model. You also get to work with creative people and engineers and share their vision of a perfect model. The feeling of watching the hotel transform is somewhat like a proud parent watching his child growing. Even though this is my third pre-opening I m still learning When given lemons make lemonade. Life is all about challenges it s what you make them out to be. After working for nearly a year the hotel sponsored me to join SHATEC as its pioneer batch in NTC-2 in Front Office course. The course gave me better insights into what the industry had to offer. I worked my way up from entry level to tour coordinator sales manager regional sales manager conventions & incentives sales manager director of sales director of marketing financial controller EAM - F&B and Rooms VP Development and finally general manager with various chains. What s your mantra When given lemons make lemonade. Life is all about challenges it s what you make them out to be. What s your advice to young graduates Don t be afraid to get your hands dirty. Describe your job and what you like about it. Your funniest or most memorable training moment at SHATEC My current role is interesting and challenging. I have to start the hotel from ground zero as it is still in the building stages. As a GM in an operational hotel you can count on department heads to help you formulate the day-to-day operation. However at project level you are almost running solo. Decisions made at this stage would be critical when the hotel is in operation. An example is how many meeting rooms to build If you underbuild or overbuild it would have a drastic impact on your business plan. In the 80 s we had to learn how to type with the manual typewriter. Most of us started off typing with two fingers even one. I remember we had to learn how to type with all 10 fingers without looking at the keyboard. This was something only secretaries had to learn then I never imagined how useful this skill is and I m proud to say I can now type with 10 fingers without looking at the keyboard and I dare say faster than my secretary 74 Developing Hospitality Talent Mr Willie Ong Vice President Ascott Centre for Excellence Singapore How did you find your job calling and what does it take to rise to the top What s your advice to young graduates Respect and learn from your peers subordinates and superiors. Earn the respect and trust of your colleagues so when you climb the ladder people will respect and trust you. Schools do not teach you life experiences. You learn this on the job. Do not try to run before you can walk. I always enjoy interacting with people and assisting people so the hotel industry was a natural choice for a career. I did not aim for a particular position or have a timeline to reach that position. If you work hard continuously learn and improve have good interpersonal skills and add value to the organisation it will recognise you. Respect and learn from your peers subordinates and superiors. Earn the respect and trust of your colleagues so when you climb the ladder people will respect and trust you. Schools do not teach you life experiences. You learn this on the job. Do not try to run before you can walk. Your funniest or most memorable training moment at SHATEC Describe your job and what you like about it. My team and I oversee the learning and development initiatives of the organisation. We work with our colleagues from the different properties to continuously improve our policies and procedures. Our aim is to improve Ascott s operational excellence. My satisfaction comes from imparting knowledge and skills to our colleagues and working with the team to improve service delivery and procedures. Unlike other learning and development departments Ascott Centre for Excellence is also a Continuing Education and Training (CET) Centre of the Singapore Workforce Development Agency offering WSQ programmes to the hospitality industry. Hence we are also involved in training other hotel staff. My most memorable moment was when I saw how Mr Pakir walked the talk and put students and staff welfare as the priority. What s your mantra No man is an island. Work as a team and together find a win-win solution for everyone. 75 Developing Hospitality Talent Mr Pang Kok Keong Chef Owner Sugar Daddy Group Singapore How did you find your true job calling and what does it take to rise to the top What s your advice to young graduates You will reap what you sow. Be ready to make sacrifices be committed to your craft and do not expect things to be easier at the top they only get harder I always knew I wanted to do something that was food related. My mum is my biggest influence as she was a hawker all her life and I grew up helping out at the stall. When I was doing my industrial attachment at the now defunct Imperial Hotel I was always made to help in the pastry kitchen. That was when my interest in pastry grew and stayed. I m nowhere near the top yet but I think it takes an astounding amount of commitment and dedication to get there. You will reap what you sow. Be ready to make sacrifices be committed to your craft and do not expect things to be easier at the top they only get harder Your funniest or most memorable training moment at SHATEC The smell from the training kitchen the walk to Nassim Hill and Mt. Sophia campus. I relish these fond memories and the training I received. Describe your job and what you like about it. Creating new recipes planning our annual marketing calendar attending management meetings chairing operation meetings developing new design for packaging planning new catering menus liaising with overseas suppliers I personally see to all aspects of the business operation including store design purchasing of all fittings etc but ultimately the food we serve is my priority. What s your mantra It could be worse. 76 Developing Hospitality Talent Mr Pek Chin Siong Executive Director Hotel Operations Marina Bay Sands Singapore How did you find your true job calling and what does it take to rise to the top What s your mantra The hospitality industry provides abundant opportunities. At the same time it is competitive. Seize the opportunities that come their way big or small to gain invaluable experience. You must however temper your ambition with patience. I started my career with a scholarship from Westin Stamford and Westin Plaza (now Swissotel The Stamford and Fairmont respectively). With the scholarship I earned the Higher Diploma in Hotel Management in 1 995 with SHATEC. This is my 18th year in the industry and I am still enjoying it. To succeed one must be patient and persevere. Having a calm temperament logical mind high EQ and good sense of humour are also plusses especially when handling challenging situations. which literally means to use the sky as a blanket when it falls. Think positively at all times and turn the situation around no matter how challenging it is. What s your advice to young graduates Begin by building a strong foundation equip yourself with the relevant knowledge skills and experience. Learning is a lifelong process and constant upgrading will help you stay relevant in the industry. The hospitality industry provides abundant opportunities. At the same time it is competitive. Seize the opportunities that come your way big or small to gain invaluable experience. You must however temper your ambition with patience. Rome was not built in a day so reaching the pinnacle of your career might take some knocks along the way. Describe your job and what you like about it. I am responsible for the hotel operations of Marina Bay Sands taking care of 2 561 rooms which include the 1 suites in our property. 95 With such a massive property you can imagine the dynamic working environment I come to everyday. Never a dull moment Delivering excellent service to guests is vital to Marina Bay Sands hence the culture of learning and development is strong in our company. I help ensure that my team members are sent for regular and relevant training to meet the high standards required. I enjoy creating a conducive work environment and enabling my team members to reach their full potential. My job satisfaction lies in anticipating and meeting our guests needs and making their stay at Marina Bay Sands a once-in-a-lifetime experience. Your funniest or most memorable training moment at SHATEC I found the love of my life a SHATEC classmate became my wife. We now have four lovely daughters. 77 Developing Hospitality Talent Mr Justin Quek Director QBS Dining Concepts and Principal Chef Sky on 57 Marina Bay Sands Singapore England at the Roux brothers restaurants Le Gavroche in London and the Waterside Inn in Berkshire. This was when I also picked up the French language. always be new things to learn. It s important to keep an open mind. What s your mantra Always work hard and never give up. Learn from the best and never take for granted any advice given to you. Better yourself through your mistakes. It was my insatiable hunger to learn new things and explore the unknown that finally led me back to Singapore to carve out the path to where I am now. In 1 994 I co-founded Les Amis a French restaurant with my good friend Ignatius Chan and stayed there for nearly a decade before opening my own restaurants in Taipei and Shanghai. Life has been good to me especially since I ve had little formal schooling after leaving school at the age of 16. Always work hard and never give up. Learn from the best and never take for granted any advice given to you. Better yourself through your mistakes. What s your advice to young graduates How did you find your job calling and what does it take to rise to the top Describe your job and what you like about it. My travels and curiosity about the world shaped my culinary path. I grew up in the Queen s Street Bugis area tending to my parent s fruit stall and developing a love for and familiarity with local food. At the age of 20 I joined the merchant marine as a steward. I remembered being fascinated by how simple ingredients could be turned into gourmet meals. This fascination eventually became a passion and I started teaching myself to make everything I could think of breads pastries classic dishes etc from the different countries we docked at. After this little adventure I enrolled at SHATEC and trained at Mandarin Oriental Singapore and The Oriental Bangkok (now Mandarin Oriental Bangkok). A cooking tour of France followed and I found myself working in famed kitchens like Roland Mazere s Le Centenaire and at Jean Bardet in the Loire Valley among others. I ended off my year in France by training in 78 I m currently the Principal Chef at Sky on 57 at Marina Bay Sands Singapore. The restaurant is located 200m up in the air. My role is to inspire my team train and lead them with my concepts to create new menus and evolve the dining experience at Sky on 57 The cuisine is Franco. Asian owing to my modern French training and my love of Asian flavours. Essentially it is a showcase of Singapore where I present modern Asian food using French techniques. I also run an F&B consultancy firm in Singapore and Hong Kong. I own and run Just In Bistro & Wine Bar as well as Justin Signatures in Taipei and am a consultant for Bon Vivant in Shanghai. This year I will also be releasing a line of ready-made sauces Justin Quek Flavours. Everyday is a new learning experience for me. Even with my training and mastery of the fine art of modern French cuisine I still believe in absorbing whatever information and skills I can. In life there s no such thing as the end of learning. Everyday is a new day and there ll In addition to the good foundation you have built you need to be open to criticism this is how you learn the most. If you learn from the mistakes you make it will make you a better person. Finally go out and try other chefs cuisines. Learn from them because if you don t you won t be able to improve and you won t have a point of comparison between your cuisine and theirs. Your funniest or most memorable training moment at SHATEC I had fond memories of interesting F&B projects we embarked in school with the trainees from The Oriental Singapore and my classmates. Developing Hospitality Talent Mr Bernard Rodrigues General Manager The Charterhouse Causeway Bay Hong Kong How did you find your job calling and what did it take to rise to the top What s your mantra Stay focus and humble in your objectives and never give up. Hard work and patience will be duly recognised and rewarded when the right opportunity comes. When I was in grade school I would follow my dad to his office a travel agency next to Raffles Hotel. I used to roam around the hotel grounds during the weekends as a child and from that moment I knew I wanted to be part of this business. So I enrolled into SHATEC in 1 986 through a scholarship obtained from Marina Mandarin. After graduating from SHATEC I spent sometime learning more about the hospitality trade starting from the bottom and slowly moving myself up to middle management. I took every opportunity that was given to me to develop myself further and to learn as much as possible about the different operations within the hotel. However I also knew that if I wanted to be a good hotelier I needed to gain overseas exposure. This gave me the chance to experience diverse cultures and develop new managerial and leadership skills and perspectives. This coupled with my passion and dedication for the job helped me be where I am today. Character cannot be developed in ease and quiet. Only through experiences of trail and suffering can the soul be strengthened vision cleared ambition inspired and success achieved. Helen Keller What s your advice to young graduates Stay focus and humble in your objectives and never give up. Hard work and patience will be duly recognised and rewarded when the right opportunity comes. Your funniest or most memorable training moment at SHATEC There are many memories at SHATEC but the best was when I was Vice Captain of SHATEC s dragon boat team. The SHATEC Spirit was very much a part of us and the sports brought us faculty members and students closer together. We even won two bronze medals in International and hotel races. Describe your job and what you like about it. As a general manager I am accountable to all stakeholders be they owners (take care of their assets and profits) customers (deliver quality service) staff (motivate and develop) and community (be a CSR-oriented organization). 79 Developing Hospitality Talent Mr Philip Cyril Raj General Manager Bay Hotel Singapore How did you find your true job calling and what does it take to rise to the top What s your advice to young graduates It s a journey there are no short-cuts. Understand the fundamentals and build a strong foundation so you can make sound decisions. Be aware of the changing trends and understand the business. Most importantly don t forget it is a business that involves people. I was having a casual chat with my uncle who was working in the industry and he described the industry as multi-faceted with various departments under one roof. The key message I received was that with hard work you could climb from rank-and-file to become general manager. That excited me to join the industry. To rise to the top takes hard work involvement and managing your own emotions. It s a journey there are no short-cuts. Understand the fundamentals and build a strong foundation so you can make sound decisions. Be aware of the changing trends and understand the business. Most importantly don t forget it is a business that involves people. Your funniest or most memorable training moment at SHATEC Describe your job and what you like about it. When I was asked to do a group presentation for 45 minutes and I never realised I could actually speak well in front of a crowd until that day. Currently my job entails pre-opening and managing the Bay Hotel Singapore an independent hotel. Also working with the owner to build an expansion plan for AsiaPacific. The idea of having to re-engineer the organisational structure change the business model to suit current market needs and achieve the desired goals is rewarding. What s your mantra Don t be best one day. Be good every day. 80 Developing Hospitality Talent Mr Eric Teo Culinary Consultant ET Culinary Arts Singapore How did you find your true job calling and what does it take to rise to the top During my time at Grand Hyatt Singapore I was given the opportunity to be transferred into the kitchen and the executive chef sent me to SHATEC to study the one-year NTC-3 in Food Preparation. To reach the top one must be passionate about his job and able to take criticisms and negative feedback. Never give up and be humble when you reach the top. Your funniest or most memorable training moment at SHATEC The funniest was when my Instructor tried to explain the parts of the cow to us and he asked us to imagine he is the cow. The most memorable training moment was the first time I lighted up the traditional conventional oven. The pilot light must be pressed and held five to 10 minutes only then it worked. Also cleaning up the kitchen after lessons. Many of us did not realize how important this was. Don t rush to become a chef. Get it right the first time and always ask questions. Never argue with a chef and stay positive. Describe your job responsibility and what you like about it I research and develop everything from ingredients and spices to kitchen utensils and equipment for suppliers and companies. It s like an F&B solution centre. I get to meet different companies and people with different requirements and expectations but the same goal. What s your mantra The quality is in the details. What s your advice to young graduates Don t rush to become a chef. Get it right the first time and always ask questions. Never argue with a chef and stay positive. 81 Developing Hospitality Talent Mr Edmund Toh Assistant Vice President Culinary Operations Food & Beverage Resorts World Sentosa Singapore and President Singapore Chefs Association How did you find your job calling and what does it take to rise to the top What s your advice to young graduates As the adage goes a journey of a thousand miles must begin with a single step. My first step was when I was a trainee chef at SHATEC. There I learnt the fundamental culinary skills. It was also where doors of opportunity opened for me to further my career as a professional chef. To rise to the top sacrifices must be made. I worked in different countries like Beijing South Korea Egypt and in Shanghai for 1 years 1 to gain better opportunities and experience different food cultures globally. The effort is similar to scaling a mountain where endurance perseverance and motivation all play a major role. Without the internal drive I would not be the executive chef of Resorts World Sentosa (RWS) responsible for more than 30 kitchens. Stay focus and always envision what you want to achieve. Have passion in what you do and keep reminding yourself why you are working so hard for. Always bear in mind that hard work will eventually pay off. Stay focus and always envision what you want to achieve. Have passion in what you do and keep reminding yourself why you are working so hard for. Aways bear in mind that hard work will eventually pay off. Your funniest or most memorable training moment at SHATEC Describe your job and what you like about it. One of the funniest moments was when everyone had to take turns to cook in the cafeteria for all the other students and it turned out to be comical as we had more than 10 variations of chicken rice nasi lemak and chicken briyani dished out at the end of the day. This was because all of us came from different hotels backgrounds and F&B organisations there was no specific recipe for us to follow so everyone cooked according to our own style and method. I was part of the opening team of RWS in 2009. I am now in charge of all the F&B outlets in RWS including those in Universal Studios Malaysian Food Street six themed hotels casino and the Marine Life Park. I enjoy my job as it allows me to interact with people from all walks of life. What s your mantra If you want others to do a good job give others a good job to do. 82 Developing Hospitality Talent 83 Developing Hospitality Talent 84 Developing Hospitality Talent Randy Chow Tony Khoo Pang Kok Keong Justin Quek Eric Teo Edmund Toh years 30 secret recipes of top chefs 30 PART SIX 85 Developing Hospitality Talent 80s Canap s 2000s Canap s Confit of Ocean Trout Honey Pineapple Emulsion & Salsa Mud Crab Remoulade with Yuzu Daikon Roasted Duckling Bigarade with Star Anise Flavoured Tomato Salsa Appetiser Soup Compressed Goose Liver wrapped with Smoked Duck with Passion Fruit Jelly and Micro Greens Appetiser Braised Beef Cheek in Crispy Yam Hash served with Chipotle Hollandaise Niciose Salad Slow-cooked Pork Belly with Apple Salsa Borscht Soup with Braised Beef Short Ribs Main Course Salt Baked Whole Pigeon with Smoked Onion Fried Quail Egg and Thyme Jus Whole Sole Meuniere with Lemon and Parsley Boiled Potato in Pan Soup Garden Green Gazpacho with Japanese Sake Lobster Chowder Mushroom Coffee with Crispy Mussels Norwegian Salmon and Scallop in Green Tea Broth Dessert Crepe Suzette Main Course Braised Oxtail in Red Wine with Potato Pur e Zucchini and Summer Vegetables Sous Vide Chicken Breast in Smoked Oil Fig Glazed Foie Gras Caramelised Endive Manchego Espuma Thyme Jus Pan Roasted Dover Sole Preserved Lemon Espuma Parsley Burnt Butter and Capers 90s Canap s Confit of Pulled Duck Leg Baked in Brioche with Lentil Citrus Beetroot Sauce Langoustine with Petit Pois Mousseline & Olive Oil Pearl Dessert Rouge Appetiser Soup JQ s Salad with bamboo shoot & fresh truffle shavings Layered Quail and Bacon Poached Apricot and Liver Mousse Oven Roasted White Peaches with Caramelised Filo & Vanilla Ice Cream J adore Beef Consomm with Poached Egg and Compressed Beef Main Course Sea Urchin on Foie Gras Custard and Multi Grain Rice Chazuke Slow Cooked Salmon Braised Radish and Beet Mandarin Orange and Ginger Emulsion Dessert 86 Cr me Caramel Fondant Au Chocolat Developing Hospitality Talent Roasted Duckling Bigarade With Star Anise Flavoured Tomato Salsa Method 1. Season the duck with grilled seasoning. Put into a pre heated oven of 180 C. 2. Bake for 50mins. Set aside to cool. 3. Heat up the pan and add in the butter. 4. Pan-sear the orange segment. 5. Seed and skin the tomato and cut them into slices. 80s - Canap s by Edmund Toh Ingredients 2.2 kg 10 gm 50 gm 50 pcs 750 gm 20 gm 100 gm 50 gm 1 nos 5 gm 5 gm 2 gm 500 gm Duck Fresh Grilled Seasoning Butter Orange Segments Fresh Tomato Star Anise grounded Onion Red Chinese Parsley Fresh lemon Salt Sugar Black Pepper crushed 6. Cut the onion into slices and chop the chinese parsley. Zest the lemon squeeze the juice. 7 Add all ingredients together and season with . salt sugar and black crushed pepper. 8. Thinly slice the sweet potato and deep fried for garnish. Sweet Potato thin sliced Canap s 87 Developing Hospitality Talent Compressed Goose Liver wrapped with Smoked Duck with Passion Fruit Jelly and Micro Greens 3. Carefully place seared goose liver into the lined terrine mould spoon blanched pistachio followed by another layer of seared liver fill mould to the top. 4. Finish by covering the terrine with the remaining sliced smoked duck. 5. Store finished product in the chiller with a heavy object on top to aid compression overnight. 6. For the gelee line baking pan with cling wrap add 4.5gm of sugar into apple pectin 80s - Appetiser by Randy Chow Ingredients 4 nos 2 nos 1 cup Smoked Duck Breast thinly sliced Goose Liver Pistachio blanched Black Pepper Sea Salt Granulated Sugar Apple Pectin Passion Fruit Pur e Mango Pur e Glucose Citric Acid Passion Fruit Gelee 185 gm 4.5 gm 37 gm .5 125 gm 56.2 gm 2.5 gm Method 7 Combine both pur e and bring to a boil add . the remaining 183gm of sugar to dissolve. Add the glucose and bring to a boil. 8. Add the combined sugar and pectin and cook until the mixture reaches 108 C. 9. Allow the gelee to stand until set store at room temperature 1. Line terrine mould with layer of cling wrap followed by the thinly sliced smoked duck breast. 2. Season goose liver fillet with sea salt and black pepper pan-sear both sides till golden brown set aside to cool. Micro Greens Pink Peppercorn (optional) Assembly 1. To assemble dish sliced liver terrine into bite size portion garnish with accompanying passion fruit gelee and micro greens. 88 Appetiser Developing Hospitality Talent Borsch Soup with Braised Beef Short Ribs Method Ingredients 300 gm 2 litres 100 gm 100 gm 100 gm 100 gm 500 gm 1 tbsp 100 gm 1x8 tsp pinch pinch 1 2 tsp 1. Slice one part of the beetroot horizontally and the other part into slices. 2. Cook the beetroot in half the stock until tender remove and set aside. Keep the liquid. 3. Sweat remaining vegetables until soft. 4. Add stock and spices and bring to boil. 5. Add beetroot stock and beetroot slices into the stock pot. 80s - Soup by Eric Teo 6. Remove any fat from surface. 7 Add beef tenderloin cube and red wine . vinegar and adjust seasonings Beetroot cleaned and sliced Chicken stock Leek diced Onion diced Celery diced Cabbage diced Beef Tenderloin cubed Red Wine Vinegar Carrot diced Sour Cream thick Dill chopped Black Peppercorn crushed Salt To Serve 1. Place the sliced beetroot and the rest of the ingredients layer by layer then garnish with sour cream and chopped dill. 2. Serve immediately. Soup 89 Developing Hospitality Talent Salt Baked Whole Pigeon with Smoked Onion Fried Quail Egg and Thyme Jus Smoked Onion 1. Hot smoke the onion in a tray for 5 mins at low heat till caramelised and drizzle with olive oil. Ingredients 200 gm 150 gm 150 gm 130 gm Pigeon 1. Remove the carcass of the quail from the neck downwards. 2. Stuff the cavity with the filling and secure with a skewer. 3. Marinate with paprika thyme and seasoning. 4. Sear quail on a cast iron pan till golden brown. 5. In a heat proof pan lay smoked onion evenly on the base and place the quail on top. Cover the entire surface with vine leaves. 6. Cover with salt crust and bake in a pre-heat oven at 180 C for 8 mins. Pigeon deboned Olive Oil Paprika Thyme chopped Salt and Black Pepper to season White Onion chopped Zuchinni diced Button Mushroom diced Morel Mushroom diced Chorizo diced Thyme chopped Chicken Stock Salt and Black Pepper to season White Onion sliced 5mm thick Wood Chip Olive Oil Demi Glace Fresh Thyme sniped Masala Wine Quail Egg cooked Deep fried Coarse Salt Egg White Vine Leaves Filling 80s - Main Course by Tony Khoo Ingredients Salt Crust Filling 1. Mix well egg white and salt. 1. Sweat chorizo for 2 mins till the fats are released. 2. Add onion zuchinni and mushroom. Continue to cook for another 3 mins and add in chicken stock. 3. Simmer till all vegetable absorbed the chicken stock and fold in thyme. 60 gm 25 gm 30 gm 10 gm 20 gm 0.5 gm 75 gm Smoked Onion 50 gm 10 gm 15 gm Thyme Jus Thyme Jus 100 gm 7 gm 50 gm 8 nos 1. Reduce wine till syrupy and add in demi glace. Infuse with fresh thyme before serving and strain. Salt Crust 300 gm 300 gm 100 gm 90 Main Course Developing Hospitality Talent Whole Sole Meuniere with Lemon and Parsley Boiled Potato in Pan Method Sole 1. Season sole with salt and pepper. Dust evenly with flour and pan-fry in a pan with butter. 2. Once fish is cooked remove from the pan reserving the butter. 3. Deglaze the pan with lemon juice and whisk to emulsify the butter and juice. 4. Adjust seasoning add chopped parsley and place the sole back into the pan to serve. Ingredients 4 nos 100 gm 200 gm 80 gm 15 gm 4 nos 20 pcs 8 pcs 8 pcs 8 pcs 8 pcs 80 gm 5 gm Dover Sole (400gm per no) gutted Plain Flour Unsalted Butter Lemon Juice Parsley chopped Egg boiled Salt and White Pepper to season Potato 1 4 turned Carrot 1 4 turned Yellow Zucchini 1 4 turned Green Zuchinni 1 4 turned Fennel 1 4 cut 80s - Main Course by Tony Khoo Vegetable. 1. Boil all vegetables till cooked and saut with butter. 2. Adjust seasoning and toss in the chopped parsley. Unsalted Butter Parsley chopped Salt and White Pepper to season Main Course 91 Developing Hospitality Talent 5. Stir in the melted butter. 6. Cover and rest in the fridge for at least 3 hrs. 7 Grease a non-stick pan lightly with melted . butter. 8. Pour enough crepe mix into the pan to form a very thin crepe. 9. Fry at medium heat with light brown color. 10. When cooled fold the crepe into triangles. Ingredients Sauce 26 gm 1 2 nos 6 nos 150 gm 100 gm 20 gm Brown Butter Orange Zest Orange Wedges Orange Juice Sugar Grand Marnier Cake Flour Milk Whole Egg Vegetable Oil Melted Butter Crepe 80s - Dessert by Pang Kok Keong Crepe Suzette 1. Heat up a frying pan add sugar cook to caramel. 2. Deglaze with juice and add orange wedges reduce slightly at medium heat. 3. Add the crepe and cook. Add zest. 4. Flamb with grand marnier. 5. Remove from heat and monte in the brown butter. 6. Serve with vanilla ice cream. Method Crepe Mix 1. Place the flour in a mixing bowl. 2. Add the milk a little at a time stirring at the same time making sure not to form any lumps. 3. Add eggs and vegetable oil. 4. Strain the above mixture through a fine conical sieve. 250 gm 500 gm 80 gm 15 gm 15 gm 92 Dessert Crepe Suzette Developing Hospitality Talent on t o lle c eg a e in rioc e it entil itr s eetroot Sa ce 6. Fill into a brioche and bake. Set aside to rest and cool. 7 Cut half a little of the base to balance. Next . place a small piece of the heart of the butter lettuce on it. 8. Slice 2 thin slices of the sous vide duck breast and place on to the brioche. 9. Drizzle the breast with Lentil Citrus Beetroot Sauce onto the lettuce cup. 10. Garnish with sprig of chervil and a wedge of baby beet root. Ingredients 600 gm 5 gm 150 gm 5 gm 80 gm 0.2 gm 500 ml 500 gm 25 nos 100 pcs 350 gm 400 gm 8 gm 150 gm 500 ml 20 gm 20 gm 1 ml 4 10 ml 10 gm 5 gm 20 gm Duck Leg Whole Black Peppercorn Shallot Whole Fresh Thyme Garlic Whole Bayleaf Corn Oil Duck Fat Brioche mini 90s - Canap s by Edmund Toh Method Beetroot Sauce 1. Mix all ingredients together in a mixing bowl and blend it with a hand blender. 2. Heat up the pot and add in olive oil. 3. Saut the vegetable till fragrant then deglaze with white wine. Add in orange juice and a little chicken stock. 4. Next add in the beetroot lentil and the buckwheat. 4. Continue to add chicken stock and simmer till cooked. 5. Fold in the beetroot sauce season with salt and pepper. Confit of Pulled Duck Leg Baked in Brioche with Lentil Citrus Beet Root Sauce 1. Heat up the duck fat oil garlics shallots peppercorn thyme and bayleaf in a pot to 80 C. 2. Sear the duck and summer it in oil. 3. Put into a pre-heated oven. Baked for 100 C for 2 3 hrs. 4. Remove from oven and leave aside to cool. 5. Debone and shred the meat. Sous Duck Breast Lentil Citrus Beet Root Sauce Baby Beet Root small wedge Chervil Fresh Butter Lettuce Heart Beetroot Juice Manuka Honey Sugar Raspberry Vinegar Extra Virgin Olive Oil Sea Salt Coarse Black Pepper Cr me Fraiche Beetroot Sauce 20 gm 15 gm 10 gm 10 gm 60 gm 100 gm 50 gm 3 pcs 200 ml 100 ml 50 ml 50 ml 100 ml Carrot diced Celariac diced Celery diced Leek diced Beetroot diced Lentil soak over night Buckwheat Bayleaf Chicken Stock Beetroot Sauce Orange Juice Olive Oil White Wine Canap s 93 Developing Hospitality Talent ango stine it etit & Olive Oil Pearl ois o sseline Ingredients Langoustin 4 kg 5 gm 1 gm 150 ml Petit Pois Mousseline 1. In a sauce pot add in the olive oil and shallot and sweat until soft 2. Next add in the rest of the ingredients and bring it to boil. 3. Place into Pacojet and freeze it. 4. Freeze and blend continuously for 3 times. 5. In a sauce pot pour the Petit Pois mixture and bring to simmer until consistent. Leave in chiller to cool. 90s - Canap s by Edmund Toh Langoustine 8 12 shelled Salt White Peppercorn milled Clarified Butter Egg White Ikan Flour Butter unsalted Icing Sugar Sea Salt Chip Method Langoustin 1. Pre-heat the hot plate at 180 C. 2. Season the langoustine with salt and pepper pan-sear until medium and place it in the chiller. 3. Slice into desired size. To Serve 100 gm 100 gm 100 gm 40 gm 10 gm 500 gm 70 gm 560 ml 4 gm 12 gm 10 ml 100 gm 3 pun 1. Pipe the mousseline into the glass and place the langoustine on it. 2. Top olive oil pearl. Garnish with shiso cress purple. 3. Lay the chip on the glass before serving. Petit Pois Mousseline Frozen Green Peas Shallot peeled and sliced Chicken Stock Fresh Thyme Leaf Butter unsalted Olive Oil Olive Oil Pearl Shiso Cress Purple Chip 1. Melt the butter. 2. Place all the ingredients in a mixing bowl and whisk it until completely dissolved. Fold well. 3. Spread mixture thinly to desired shape on grease paper evenly. 4. Baked it at 120 C for 8 mins. 94 Canap s Developing Hospitality Talent JQ s Salad with bamboo shoot res tr e s a ings Method Ingredients 160 gm 8 nos 8 nos 80 gm 100 gm 80 gm 40 gm 12 1. Cook asparagus and snow peas in salted boiling water until tender. Refresh in iced water and drain. Slice the asparagus with a mandolin and halve the snow peas lengthways. 2. Blanch the cherry tomatoes for 15 seconds refresh in iced water peel off the skin then slice in half. 3. Cut the bamboo shoot and mango into thin slices. 4. Make the truffle vinaigrette by whisking the vinegar and truffle juice together with the salt then add the oils in a thin stream whisking constantly to emulsify. Toss the mesclun salad asparagus cherry tomatoes bamboo shootand mango with truffle vinaigrette. Add salt and pepper if necessary. 5. Place the salad in the center of each plate use a truffle shaver to shave summer truffles around it and garnish with slivers of Parmesan cheese. Summer Bamboo Shoot cooked Asparagus Tips Cherry Tomatoes Snow Peas Mango Mesclun Salad washed Fresh Summer Truffles (optional) Parmesan cheese salt and shavings Pepper to taste White Truffle Oil Black Truffle Oil Salad Oil Sherry Vinegar Black Truffle Juice from the Tin Salt and Pepper to taste Truffle Vinaigrette 70 ml 70 ml 180 ml 15 ml 100 ml 90s - Appetiser by Justin Quek Appetiser 95 Developing Hospitality Talent Layered Quail and Bacon Poached Apricot and Liver Mousse 5. Remove breast from mold pan sear the surface (bacon) until golden brown portion accordingly and serve with the rest of the accompaniment. Ingredients 20 nos 10 pcs Liver Mousse Quail Breast Kosher salt w freshly ground pepper Smoked Bacon Canola oil Cured Foie Gras Cold Water Quail Liver Canola Oil Garlic Clove Crushed Peeled Fresh Thyme Chopped Shallots Butter Dry White Wine Dry White Wine Sugar water Dried Apricots Frisee Leaves Herbed Oil Balsamic Glace 1. Cure liver in brine for 3 hrs drain and dry with paper towel. 2. Caramelised liver on a hot pan add fresh thyme garlic shallots wine and cream cook until liver is pink. 90s - Appetizer by Randy Chow Liver Mousse 100 gm 1 kg 6 pcs 1 nos 1 sprig 30 gm 20 gm 120 gm Method Quail Breast 1. Remove sinew and lightly score quail breast season and store in fridge. 2. Lightly butter rectangle mold place quail breast into mold with smoked bacon in between repeat until it reaches your required height with bacon on top. 3. Place filled mold into a large bag and vacuum on high refrigerate. 4. Cook at 74 for 12 hrs. allow to cool C in a water bath before storing in the fridge. 3. Remove thyme pass mixture through a blender until smooth. Strain mixture through a fine conical strainer. 4. Pour mixture into desire mold and store in the fridge. Apricot 100 gm 105 gm 200 gm 10 nos sprigs Apricot 1. Heat wine and add sugar simmer until sugar is fully dissolved add dried apricots into mixture steep for 12 hrs at room temperature. Garnish 96 Appetiser Developing Hospitality Talent Beef Consomm with Poached Egg and Compressed Beef 8. Served hot and garnish with poached egg julinenne vegetables and a slice of compressed beef. Ingredients 1 kg 3 nos 5 litres 10 slices 10 nos 300 gm 150 gm 150 gm 5 nos 1 tsp 5 gm 2 pcs Clarification Mixture 1. Mix the minced beef with the mirepoix adding little stock and beating the composition vigorously to ensure it is well combined. Fold in the frothy egg white mixture. Minced Beef Onion cut in half (medium size) Beef Stock clear Compressed Beef cooked Poached Eggs Carrot chopped Leek chopped Celery chopped Egg White with Shell Black Peppercorn Fresh Thyme Bay Leaf Mirepoix Compressed Beef 90s - Soup by Eric Teo 1. Heat a pot with olive oil and saut the Mirepoix add in the tomato paste and cooked until its color turned darker. 2. Add in beef short ribs and stir for 2 mins. 3. Add in red wine and reduce it by half then add in beef stock . 4. Simmer for 1hr 30mins or till tender and remove from the pot and set aside. 5. Reduce the stock to form sauce texture then transfer the short ribs back into the stock . 6. Trim the beef short ribs and remove the bones. 7 Place the beef into a 7 inch x 7 inch x 2 inch . tray and press firmly downward to ensure its well compressed. 8. Wrap with plastic film and keep chilled overnight. 9. To serve - remove the compressed beef from the tray and slice to desire-size then steam for 2 mins. Method 1. Burn the onion halves on the hot plate without oil till totally burnt. 2. Whisk egg white egg shells and black peppercorn until the mixture turns frothy and foamy. 3. Place the clarification mixture into a large pot. Pour the cold stock into it and mix well. Bring it to a boil stirring constantly so that the clarification does not stick to the bottom. Add the well browned onion. Reduce heat and let it simmer slowly for 3 hrs. 4. Gradually the beef-vegetable mixture will eventually solidify. Do not stir anymore. 5. Using a spoon gently break a small opening or hole in the solid mixture about 3 inches wide to allow broth to bubble through. 6. To strain the consomm carefully move the meat mixture to the side and use a ladle to remove the consomm from the pot. 7 Pour it through a strainer lined with . cheesecloth. Try to remove as little of the raft as possible as you strain the consomm this will ensure a crystal clear consomm . Adjust seasoning. Degrease the top layer. Seasonings Salt and Pepper Compressed Beef 800 gm 200 ml 2 lt 100 gm 100 gm 60 gm 50 gm 20 gm 50 ml 5 gm 5 gm Boneless Beef Short Ribs Red Wine Beef Stock Onion diced Carrot diced Celery diced Tomato paste Garlic chopped Olive Oil Tarragon chopped Thyme chopped Soup 97 Developing Hospitality Talent Sea Urchin on Foie Gras Custard lti rain ice a e Miso Cream Chasuke 1. Mix well all ingredients and keep chill. 1. Place rice and asparagus in a bowl. Top with ume. 2. Pour the tea over the rice upon serving. Ingredients 200 gm 150 gm 150 gm 130 gm 150 gm Sea Urchin Foie Gras diced Chicken Stock Eggs Foie Gras rolled to 3cm thick Salt and White Pepper to season Japanese Mayonnaise Shiro Miso Yuzu Juice Braised Vegetable 1. Braise lotus root and red radish till cooked and soft. 90s - Main Course by Tony Khoo Miso Cream 60 gm 20 gm 10 gm Assembly Method Custard 1. Sear foie gras over high heat for 3 secs and pat dry. Mix well seasoning chicken stock and egg. 2. Pour mixture in small bowl and add in foie gras. 3. Steam at 80 C for 15 mins till cook. Steam foie gras roll for 8 mins at 64 C. 4. Keep chill and portion. 1. Place sea urchin on foie gras custard and foie gras roll. Garnish with tobiko rock chive and coriander cress. Chazuke 500 gm 300 gm 80 gm 50 gm 180 gm 180 gm 300 gm 20 gm 20 gm 50 gm 20 stalk Green Tea Multi Grain Rice Cooked Asparagus Boiled Ume Chopped Lotus Root (Organic) Red Radish (Organic) Dashi Stock Braised Vegetables Garnish Rock Chive Coriander Cress Orange Tobiko Inaho 98 Main Course Developing Hospitality Talent Slow Cooked Salmon Braised Radish and Beet Mandarin Orange and Ginger Emulsion 2. Cook at low heat till the radish is cooked and absorb the flavour of the stock. Ingredients Salmon 160 gm 40 gm 30 gm 20 gm Beet and Carrot 1. Roast the whole beetroot and carrot with the skin in the oven at 150 C till soft. This is to extract the excess liquid in the vegetables giving a intense natural flavour of the beet and carrot. 2. Peel and cut to 1cm thickness. Drizzle with olive oil and season with salt. 90s - Main Course by Tony Khoo Salmon Portion 4 pcs Pickled Pink Ginger chopped Spring Onions chopped Shallots chopped Braised Radish 120 gm 100 gm 20 gm 80 gm 1.5 gm 1 pcs 2 gm 0.5 gm 10 gm 150 gm 150 gm 40 gm Green Pea Pur e Method Salmon 1. Season salmon with salt white pepper and olive oil. Bake in the oven for 15 mins at 55 C. 2. Mix well pink ginger spring onion and shallot like a salsa. Once the salmon is cooked spread salsa evenly on the salmon. 1. Sweat onion till soft add in green pea and chicken stock. Bring to boil and blend till smooth. 2. Return pur e to pot fold in cream and monte with butter. Adjust the seasoning and keep warm. White Radish Sliced 1cm Thick Chicken Stock Wine Wine Unsalted Butter White Peppercorn Bayleave Thyme Saffron Thread Salt and Pepper to taste Beet Carrot Olive Oil Sea Salt to taste Green Pea Mint Pur e Apple Mint Onion chopped Chicken Stock Cream 35% Fat Unsalted Butter Sea Salt to taste Mandarin Orange Juice Ginger Juice White Wine Bay Leave White Peppercorn Cardamon Pod Unsalted Butter Cream Sea Salt to taste Emulsion Radish 1. Squeeze the oranges to get 300ml of juice. In a pot reduce white wine with cardamon bayleave and peppercorn till syrupy. 2. Add in the orange juice and reduce to 1 3 of the original amount. 3. Fold in cream and monte with butter. Adjust the seasoning and add in ginger juice last. 4. Froth with a handblender. Green Pea Mint Pur e 150 gm 10 gm 50 gm 100 gm 50 gm 20 gm 30 gm 1. Peel and slice the radish. In a non-stick pan reduce white wine till syrupy add in the radish and the rest of the ingredients. Orange Emulsion 300 gm 30 gm 20 gm 1 pcs 1 gm 1 gm 150 gm 35 gm Garnish Tatami Iwashi 99 Main Course Developing Hospitality Talent Cr me Caramel Custard 1. Bring the milk to just simmering with the scraped vanilla pod. 2. Mix the whole egg vanilla extract and sugar in a whisking bowl pour the warmed milk mixture over it. 3. Strain through a fine sieve strainer. Ingredients Caramel 500 gm 100 gm 100 gm Sugar Water (A) Water (B) Milk Whole Eggs Sugar Vanilla Pod Vanilla Extract Custard Finishing 90s - Dessert by Pang Kok Keong 1. Pour the custard into the baked proof dish with the caramel syrup. 2. Bake in a water bath for 20-25min at 150 C. check by inserting a knife into the custard that comes out clean. 3. Remove from oven and chill for at least 6 hrs before serving. 1 100 gm 500 gm 180 gm 2 nos 10 gm Method Caramel 1. Make a caramel with sugar and water(A). 2. When the syrup reaches the optimal colour remove from heat and stir in water (B). 3. Using a fondant funnel or jug pour enough of the caramel syrup to line the base of a suitable size baked proof dish. 4. Set aside in chiller. 100 Dessert Developing Hospitality Talent Fondant Au Chocolat Coating 1. Sieve the cocoa powder and flour together. Reserve till needed. Ingredients 4 nos 95 gm 60 gm 120 gm 23 gm Chocolate Cake Batter Chocolate Cake Batter 1. Melt the chocolate and butter in the microwave to approx. 45 C. 2. In a whisking bowl mix the sugar and egg together. 3. Add the melted chocolate mixture to the egg. 90s - Dessert by Pang Kok Keong Whole Eggs Sugar Melted Butter Valrhona Pur Caraibe 66% Cake Flour Cake Flour Cocoa Powder For Mould Coating 100 gm 100 gm 220 gm 260 gm 4. Add the sifted flour into the above mixture to form a homogenous mixture. Chocolate Ganache Method Vanilla Ice Cream Finishing Cream Dark Chocolate 58% Milk Sugar Egg Yolk Madagascar Vanilla Cream Trimoline Stabilizer 1. In a heavy base pot bring milk and cream to boil with the scraped vanilla pod. 2. In a whisking bowl mix together the egg yolk stabilizer trimoline and sugar. Temper this mixture into the milk mixture and cook to 85 C. 3. Strain through a fine sieve and let it mature for 24hrs in the chiller. Churn in a batch freezer. Reserve till needed. 1. Grease a suitable baking mould with melted butter and coat it with the coating mixture. Knock out excess coating. 2. With a piping bag fill the mould half way with cake batter chill this part for approx. 10mins (this is to prevent the ganache from sinking to the bottom of the mould) place a ganache in the centre finish filling with cake batter. 3. Bake at 180 C for approx. 20mins 4. Unmould and serve immediately with vanilla ice cream. Vanilla Ice Cream 1600 gm 480 gm 385 gm 4 nos 800 gm 120 gm 1 gm 4 Chocolate Ganache 1. Chop the chocolate. 2. Bring the cream to a boil pour it over the chocolate and stir to form a smooth emulsion. 3. Fill the ganache in a suitable size flexipan (silicon) mould and freeze. 4. Unmould and reserve in freezer till needed. Dessert 101 Developing Hospitality Talent on t o cean ro t Honey Pineapple Emulsion & Salsa Honey Pineapple Emulsion and Salsa 1. Mix all ingredients in a mixing bowl mix well and strain. Fold in the guacamole and mould it in a ring. Ingredients 4 kg 300 ml 8 gm 400 gm 4 gm 60 gm 60 gm 1 gm 10 gm 2 kg 100 gm 30 gm 150 gm 10 gm 120 gm 0.1 gm 60 ml 250 gm 50 gm 50 gm 50 gm 30 ml 75 ml 75 ml Confit of Light Cured Ocean Trout Garnish the Trout 1. Mixed all the chopped herbs together with olive. Mustard Mayo 1. Mix well together. 2000s - Canap s by Edmund Toh Fresh Salmon Trout trimmed Vinegar Coriander Seed Sea Salt Star Anise Coriander Leaf Sugar Bay Leaf Black Pepper To Serve Method 1. Place the mould pineapple salsa then the fried sweet potato chips. 2. Next place the confit salmon top up mustard mayo and fried shredded sweet potato. Honey Pineapple Emulsion and Salsa Honey Pineapple small diced Red Chili small diced Coriander leaf chopped Calamansi Jice Sea Salt Fresh Chive chopped White Pepper Fish Sauce Guacamole Chive chopped Italian Parsley chopped Dill chopped Olive Oil Dijon Mustad Mayonaise Sweet Potato thin sliced deep fry Sweet Potato shredded deep fry Daikon Cress Confit of light cured ocean Trout 1. Trim the loin clean. 2. Mix in all the ingredients and place on top of the trout to marinate for 15mins. Then remove all the ingredients. 3. Cover the marinate trout with the chopped garnish and vacuum pack. 4. Pre-heat the thermo calculator at 50 C Sous vide cooking for 15mins. Remove to ice bath. Garnish Chopped (for the Trout) Mustard Mayo Garnish 500 gm 200 gm 3 pun 102 Canap s Developing Hospitality Talent Mud Crab Remoulade with Yuzu Daikon Method Mud Crab Remoulade Ingredients 360 gm 150 gm 3 gm 0.6 gm 0.3 gm 6 gm 3 gm 1. Mix all ingredients in a mixing bowl mix well and leave aside. Mud Crab Remoulade Yuzu Daikon 1. In a mixing bowl add all ingredients and marinate for 1hr. 2. Use the pickle Daikon and wrap it with the mud crab remoulade. 2000s - Canap s by Edmund Toh Mud Crab cooked Cr me Fraiche Yuzu Zest Salt Fine White Peppercorn milled Chive Fresh Chervil Yuzu Daikon 400 gm 30 ml 1 ml 4 10 ml 4 gm 26 gm 0.2 gm Garnish 1. Garnish with the rolled remoulade with salmon roe and daikon cress. 2. Just to serve then place onto the chip. Daikon peeled and thinly sliced (2.5cm X 9cm) Yuzu Juice Rice Vinegar Extra Virgin Oil Sea Salt Sugar White Peppercorn milled Egg White Ikan Flour Butter unsalted Icing Sugar Sea Salt Salmon Roe Daikon Cress Chip 100 gm 100 gm 100 gm 40 gm 10 gm Garnish 50 gm 3 Pun Canap s 103 Developing Hospitality Talent Braised Beef Cheek in Crispy Yam Hash ser e it ipo e Hollan aise Chipotle Hollandaise Ingredients 2 tbsp 1.5 kg 2 nos 2 nos 2 pcs 1 sprig 1 sprig 6 pcs 6 pcs 4 pcs 3 cups 3 cups 1. Whisk egg yolk and wine reduction on a hot water bath until foamy add clarified butter gradually to emulsify. 2. Add lemon to adjust to desired consistency finish sauce by adding the chopped chipotle season to taste. 3. Store Hollandaise at a warm area. Braised Beef Cheek 2000s - Appetiser by Randy Chow Yam Hash 1. Steam peeled yam in steamer until soft mashed with flour and lard. 2. Add the rest of the ingredients and mix evenly into a dough. 3. Portion and stuff the above yam mixture (bite-size) with braised beef cheek into the middle set aside to rest. 4. Heat oil in a pot gently fry yam hash until evenly brown drain well and serve with a spoonful chipotle hollandaise. Keep oil at 70 C. Olive Oil Beef Cheek trimmed Onion chopped Carrots chopped Celery chopped Parsley Thyme Bay Leaves Garlic Cloves Anchovies Red Wine Chicken Stock Method Yam Hash 600 gm 1 gm 90 5 tbs 270 gm 1 2 tbs 3 nos 2 tbs 1 gm 75 2 tbs 2 pcs Braised beef cheek 1. Pre-heat oven to 150 C. 2. Heat oil in a large casserole on high cook beef in 2-3 batches 4-5 mins each until well brown remove from dish and set aside. 3. Reduce heat to medium add vegetables and cook for 4-5 mins. Add herbs garlic and anchovies. Cook a further 2 min. Add wine to deglaze and reduce to one-third. 4. Return beef cheek to dish and add stock braised in oven until beef is tender. 5. Separate beef from liquid discard bay leaves and thyme blend liquid until smooth and reduce till desires consistency. 6. Shred beef cheek add the reduced sauce season to taste and store in fridge once cooled. Yam steamed mashed Wheat starch Tang Meen Fun Boiling water Lard shortening Sugar Salt 5 Spice pwd Egg Yolk room temperature White Wine & Shallots reduction Clarified Butter Lemon Juice Chipotle Parsley chopped Chipotle Hollandaise 104 Appeti er Developing Hospitality Talent Nicoise Salad Method Ingredients 600 gm 400 gm 425 gm 250 gm 1 2 cup 2 nos. 4 nos. 3 pc 1. Fill all ingredients for nicoise dressing into a bottle shake to create an emulsion and set aside to until further use. 2. Line salad bowl with lettuce toss the remaining ingredients except anchovy fillets with dressing. 3. Fill the tossed ingredients into salad bowl and garnish with anchovy fillet. 4. Serve immediately. 2000s - Appetiser by Randy Chow New potatoes (boiled) Haricot verts (blanched) Tuna (in oil drained) Cherry Tomatoes (halved) Black Olive Baby cos lettuce hearts separated Hard boiled eggs sliced Anchovy fillets (drained and halved) Extra virgin Olive oil Red Wine Vinegar Dijon Mustard Nicoise dressing 1 3 cup 1 3 cup 1 tbsp Appeti er 105 Developing Hospitality Talent Slow-Cooked Pork Belly with Apple Salsa Pork Crisp 1. Cook pork skin in water for 3 hrs. until soft. 2. Discard liquid place pork skin flat on a metal tray store in fridge. 3. Remove fat from skin dry in a dehydrator at 60 degrees for 5 hrs. 4. Deep fry dried pork skin until crispy golden brown cool and store in an air-tight container. Ingredients Pork Belly 1litre 800 gm 1 pcs 3 whole 10 pcs 20 ml 1 pc 6 pcs 1 sprig 2 sprig 2 tbsp 20 ml Milk Pork Belly Skin on Bay Leaf allspice Black Peppercorn Olive Oil Green Apple Dice Shallots sliced Coriander Italian Parsley Lemon Juice Extra Virgin Olive Oil Sea Salt Flakes Pork Skin Vegetable Oil Apple Salsa 2000s - Appetiser by Randy Chow Apple Salsa Method 1. Combine the above chopped ingredients add olive oil lemon juice and season to taste. 1 Slow-cook Pork belly in milk with spices at 160 C for 2.5 hrs until tender. 2. Discard liquid and allow to cool remove pork skin and cut into desired size and shape. 3. Lightly sear surface on hot pan. Miso Rice Ball cake 1. Add mirin lime zest and red miso into cooked rice while it s still hot. 2. Shape into desired size panfry both surface till crispy serve alongside the pork belly. Crisp Pork Skin 500 gm 500 ml 100 gm 1.5 tsp 15 gm 1 2 nos Miso Rice Ball cake Round Grain Rice cooked Mirin Red Miso Lime zest 106 Appetiser Developing Hospitality Talent Garden Green Gazpacho with Japanese Sake Method 1. Put all the ingredients in a food blender part by part and blend till the ice and grapes become liquid. 2. Season with salt pepper and tabasco. 3. Pour into desire glassware or wine glass and serve chilled. Ingredients 2000s - Soup by Eric Teo 1000 gm Seedless Green Grapes cleaned and stems off 50 gm Baby bittergourd seeded and sliced 200 gm Cucumber diced 30 gm white onion sliced 1 nos Green pepper sliced 50 ml Sweetened Lime Juice 100 gm Ice cubes 100 ml Japanese Sake 20 gm English Parsley chopped dash tabasco Soup 107 Developing Hospitality Talent Lobster Chowder 6. Add brandy to flamb and add wine then reduce by half. 7 Add water and stock then bring to boil. . 8. Add rice and cooked for 45 mins with lid on. 9. When the rice soften strained the stock with a fine strainer or cheese cloth. 10. Transfer back to the pot and bring to boil. 1 Thicken the soup with roux and simmer for 1. 10 mins stirring the lumps to dissolve. 2000s - Soup by Eric Teo Ingredients 8 pcs 8 pcs 60 ml 50 gm 300 gm 300 gm 300 gm 200 gm 300 gm 300 gm 6 cloves 3 kg 120 gm 75 ml 360 ml 4 litres 1.5 litres 100 gm 1 gm 40 400 ml Pinch Pinch 20 ml 30 gm 12. Add cream and tarragon. Method 1. Rinse the Lobster tail and remove shell. Season the meat salt and dash of pepper and wrapped the meat into a shape of a ball like with a plastic film. 2. Place the lobster in a hot simmering water for 5 mins or just cooked. Set aside. 3. Heat the oil in a large pot and add half recipe of the onion leek celery carrot fennel garlic and sweat for 5 mins. 4. Add lobster shells and sweat for another 10 mins until fragrant and liquid is released from the lobster head and shells. 5. Add tomato paste and cook until the paste color darkens. To Serve 1. Blanch the rest of the vegetables like onion leek fennel celery potato carrot and place them in the center of the soup plate then put the cooked lobster tail and claw on the vegetables. 2. Pour the hot soup by the side of the ingredients slowly . 3. Serve immediately. Lobster Tail shelled and cleaned Lobster Claw shelled Olive oil butter Onion diced Carrot diced Celery diced Leek diced Fennel diced Potato diced Garlic crushed Lobster heads and shells crushed Tomato Paste Brandy White wine Fish stock Water Italian rice Arborio Blonde roux Heavy cream Salt Cayenne Lemon juice Tarragon leaves chopped 108 Soup Developing Hospitality Talent Mushroom Coffee with Crispy Mussels 1. Saut the onion with butter and olive oil over medium heat on a stock pot. 2. When the onion turns soft add the mushrooms and continue to saut for 5 mins. 3. Add brewed coffee fresh milk and bring to boil. 4. Simmer for 30 mins. 5. Transfer to the food blender and process it into a fine pur e. 2000s - Soup by Eric Teo Ingredients 500 gm 500 gm 450 gm 1000 ml 500 ml 2000 ml pinch 1 2 tbsp 100 gm dash Button Mushroom sliced Shitake Mushroom sliced White Onion sliced Fresh Milk Fresh Cream Freshly Brewed Coffee Crushed Pepper Salt Butter Cubes Cinnamon Powder 6. Pour back into the pot and bring to boil but stirring time to time. 7 Add fresh cream and seasonings. . 8. Finish off with butter. 9. Dust the soup with cinnamon powder. 10. Garnish with fried crispy tempura mussels. Method For Crispy Mussels 1. Remove 20 pieces of mussels meat from shells and deep into tempura batter. 2. Fry in hot oil till crispy and sprinkle with sea salt. 3. Serve hot. Soup 109 Developing Hospitality Talent Norwegian Salmon and Scallop in Green Tea Broth Method Ingredients 200 gm 120 gm 4 pcs 100 gm 600 ml 3 slices 12 pcs 1 2 tbsp 2 pcs pinch 50 ml 1 tbsp 1 tbsp 1. Season the salmon and scallop with the soy sauce and sesame oil. 2. Lightly sear the salmon and scallop to perfection on a saut pan with little oil and set aside on a absorbent paper towel. Keep warm. 3. In a large pot bring the green tea to boil with cilantro stems the ginger wolfberries peppercorn and salt. 2000s - Soup by Eric Teo 4. Blanch the baby sprouts in green tea and set aside. 5. Simmer the green tea for 5 mins. 6. Place the cooked rice baby sprouts scallop and the salmon in the center of the deep dish soup plate. 7 Remove the cilantro stems from the green . tea broth and pour the tea broth into the soup plate. 8. Serve the soup garnished with the cilantro leaves roasted seaweed and scallions julienne. Japanese Rice cooked Salmon filet skin on sliced Large scallop cleaned Baby sprouts Freshly brewed Green Tea Ginger thinly sliced Wolfberries White Peppercorns Coriander stems Salt Cooking oil Light soy sauce Sesame oil Scallions thinly sliced Cilantro leaves for garnish Roasted seaweed sliced Garnish 3 pcs 10 gm 10 gm 1 10 Soup Developing Hospitality Talent Braised Oxtail in Red Wine with Potato Pur e Zucchini and Summer Vegetables 5. Once cooked transfer the oxtail onto a tray. Cover with cling film allow to cool then remove the oxtail meat from the bone. Strain the cooking liquid into a pan reduce to a syrupy sauce consistency skimming off any scum from the surface. Whisk in the butter adjust the seasoning and keep warm. 6. Heat up the remaining olive oil in a frying pan saut the wild mushrooms with the boneless oxtail then add the chopped parsley. 2000s - Main Course by Justin Quek Ingredients 2 kg 5 tbsp 2 nos 1 nos 1 nos 1 Stick 1 Bottle 1.5 litres 2 nos 1 nos 20 gm 100 gm 1 tbsp 8 slices Method 1. Pre-heat the oven to 1 75 C. 2. Season the oxtail then heat 3 tbsp olive oil in an ovenproof casserole. Add the oxtail turning a er a few minutes until browned evenly. Remove pour off any excess oil from the casserole and add the leeks carrots onion and celery and cook until caramelised. 3. Deglaze with red wine and reduce until one third of the liquid remains. Add veal jus and bring to a boil. Remove the scum from the surface add bay leaves rosemary and seasoning. Add the oxtail cover with a lid and cook in the oven for 2 hrs until tender. 4. Make the potato pur e by baking the potatoes in the oven until cooked approximately 1 hr. Remove and slit the potatoes scoop out the flesh and season with nutmeg butter and salt. 7 To serve assemble the oxtail in a metal ring . (a round dough cutter would be suitable) and flatten with a spoon. Top with potato pur e and wrap the zucchini slices around the oxtail. To garnish place seasonal vegetables and fresh herbs on top of the potato and spoon the sauce around the oxtail. Oxtail cut into small pieces Olive Oil Leeks cleaned and sliced Carrot peeled and cut into chunks Onion peeled and diced Celery diced Red Wine Xeal Jus Bay Leaves Sprig Rosemary Unsalted Butter cubed Wild Mushrooms (ceps button horn of plenty) cleaned Parsley chopped Zucchini blanched Seasonal vegetables of your choice blanched Fresh Herbs for garnish Salt and Pepper to taste Russet Potatoes Unsalted Butter Pinch Nutmeg Salt and Pepper to taste Chef s note Potato Pur e 2 nos 40 gm Available from any good grocery store. If not available chicken stock can be used Main Course 11 1 Developing Hospitality Talent Sous Vide Chicken Breast in Smoked Oil Fig Glazed Foie Gras Caramelised Endive Manchego Espuma Thyme Jus Foie Gras 1. Reduce vincotto till 60% of the original amount. 2. Sear foie gras while still frozen. Blast chill to stop the cooking process. 3. Regenerate in the oven till cook and brush with fig vincotto. 4. Season well. Polenta 1. Bring chicken stock and milk to boil. Add in polenta and whisk constantly. 2. Add in cheese seasoning and monte with butter. 3. Spread evenly on a tray and allow to set in the blast chiller. 4. Once chilled cut into bar and pan-fry on all side till golden brown. Endive 2000s - Main Course by Tony Khoo 1. Cut the endive into quarters and trim to 35gm per portion 2. Braise with the rest of the ingredients till soft and strain. Blast chill. 3. Reduce the liquid till syrupy and brush over the endive. 4. Place under the salamander till caramelised. Season with sea salt and keep warm. Thyme Jus 1. Sweat shallot till fragrant. Add in wine and reduce till syrupy. 2. Pour in demi glace and reduce on low heat. 3. Monte with butter and infuse with fresh lemon thyme. 4. Strain and serve. Method Smoked Oil 1. Lay onion rings evenly on a rack. Avoid stacking the onions during smoking process. 2. Hot smoke the onion ring for 20 mins till the onions are cooked and evenly browned. 3. Place onion and oil in a vacuum bag and vacuum at the highest density possible. 4. Allow to infuse in the chiller at least 2 days before using. Manchego Espuma 1. Melt manchego with water under bain marie. 2. Heat cream manchego water thyme and bay leaves for few minutes and strain. 3. Add in pro espuma and blend with handblender. 4. Fill into a siphon and charge with 2X N2O charger. 5. Keep warm. Chicken 1. Place chicken breast with the rest of the ingredients in a vaccum bag. 2. Vaccum at the highest density possible. Allow to marinate overnight. 3. Sous vide at 64 in the hot bath or steam C in the combi oven for 20mins till the internal temperature reaches 56 C. Refresh in ice water to stop the cooking process. 4. Remove chicken from the bag and sear the surface with smoked oil on a heated pan. 5. Regenerate in the oven till internal temperate reaches 63 before serving. C 1 12 Developing Hospitality Talent Ingredients 10 nos 10 gm 10 gm 50 gm 50 gm 100 gm To Taste Chicken Breast (160 gm per pc) Fresh Lemon Thyme sniped Fresh Rosemary sniped Shallot sliced Garlic sliced Smoked Oil Fine Salt and White Pepper crushed White Onion Ring Sliced 5mm Thick Pomace Oil Wood Chip 60 gm 1 gm 75 1 gm 75 30 gm 20 gm To Taste 20 nos 10 nos 25 gm 100 gm 15 gm 600 gm 150 gm 150 gm 30 gm Polenta Flour Chicken Stock Milk Parmesan Cheese Unsalted Butter Salt and White Pepper crushed US Asparagus Blanched Tomato Cherry on Vine Confit Pea Tendril Shallot Sliced Fresh Lemon Thyme Chicken Demi Glace Red Wine Port Wine Unsalted Butter Sub Recipe For Smoked Oil 250ml 200 gm 300 gm 40 gm 10 pcs 50 gm To Taste 350 gm 300 gm 65 gm 65 gm 2.5 gm 2 nos 2 nos 3 nos 120 gm 60 gm 150 gm 100 gm 250 gm 1 nos 5 gm 12 gm 30 gm To Taste Foie Gras Presliced Rougie 25 40 Fig Vincotto Sea Salt and Black Pepper crushed Yellow Endive Quarter 35gm per pc Orange Juice bottled Tamarind Juice Plum Sauce Cardamon Pod Cinnamon Stick Bay Leaves Star Anise Unsalted Butter Sugar Manchego Cheese grated Water Cream Bayleaf Fresh Lemon Thyme sniped Pro Espuma Hot Sosa Hazelnut roasted crushed Salt and White Pepper (powder) Main Course 1 13 Developing Hospitality Talent Pan Roasted Dover Sole Preserved Lemon Espuma Parsley Puree Burnt Butter and Capers Lemon Espuma 1. Place all ingredient except for cream and xanthan gum in a thermomix and blend till smooth. 2. Add in cream and xanthan gum and blend for another 30 secs till in cooperate evenly. Ingredients 4 gm 30 gm 30 gm 50 gm Parsley pur e Dover Sole trimmed 120gm per pcs Polenta Flour Fine Breadcrumb Clarified Butter Salt and White Pepper to season Preserved Lemon White only Lemon Juice Cream Butter Water Xathan Gum Manuka Honey 1. Blanch herbs in salted water and refresh in ice water immediately. 2000s - Main Course by Tony Khoo Preserved Lemon Espuma 60 gm 50 gm 35 gm 23 gm 40 gm 0.4 gm 1 gm 4 2. Place in a thermomix and blend till smooth. Add in potato mash and butter. 3. Blend at 60 C at high speed for 3 mins till smooth. Keep warm. Method Sole 1. Season well sole fillet and dust with polenta and breadcrumb. Pan-fry in butter till golden brown and bake in the oven for 4 mins till cooked. Vinaigrette 1. Heat up buerre noisette and add in the rest of the ingredients. Adjust seasoning and keep warm. Parsley Puree 100 gm 50 gm 50 gm 80 gm 15 gm Vegetables 1. Blanch all vegetables and saut with butter. Parsley Chive Tarragon Potato Boiled mashed Unsalted Butter Salt and White Pepper to season Vinaigrette 80 gm 30 gm 20 gm 12 gm Buerre Noisette Shallot Capers. Chopped White Balsamic Salt and Crushed Black Pepper to Season Zucchini Yellow Persian Baby Carrot Potato peeled and sliced Tomato Baby Fennel halves lengthwise Asparagus peeled Garnish 30 gm 8 Pcs 100 gm 4 pcs 2 nos 8 nos 14 1 Main Course Developing Hospitality Talent Oven Roasted White Peaches with Caramelised Filo & Vanilla Ice Cream 7 To assemble place a piece of baked filo on . a plate. Top with some of the flavoured whipped cream and three of the peach slices. Repeat and top with one final piece if filo. Dust with icing sugar and serve with ice cream. Ingredients 40 ml 3 nos 50 gm 1 nos 40 gm 30 ml 12 nos Chef s note 2000s - Dessert by Justin Quek Method 1. Preheat oven to 1 75 C. 2. Whip the cream until soft peaks form then refrigerate. 3. Blanch the peaches in boiling water for 20 secs. Refresh in ice water before peeling off the skin. Remove the stones and slice each peach into eight. 4. Place 50 gm sugar in a pan and heat over a low flame. When it caramelises and develops a light golden colour remove from the heat quickly whisk in the butter then add the peach slices. 5. Split the vanilla pod and scrape the seeds into the caramel with the back of a knife. Add the pod and the slide the pan into the oven. Roast until the peaches are tender then remove pan place over a flame and deglaze with the peach liqueur. 6. Remove the peach wedges from the cooking liquid and set aside. Plunge the base of the cooking pan into an ice bath to cool the cooking liquid before folding in the whipped cream. To prepare the filo rectangles you will need six sheets of filo pastry. Place a sheet of filo on a clean work top and with clarified butter. Repeat until you have five layers of filo. Do not brush the final one with butter. Make an egg wash by dissolving one teaspoon of sugar in one teaspoon of water then whisking in one egg yolk. Brush this egg wash on the top sheet of filo then cut the stack in half. Place the 12 pcs on a baking tray lined with greaseproof paper and bake for 10 mins or until golden brown. Cool and store in an airtight container. Whipping Cream White Peaches Sugar Vanilla Pod Unsalted Butter Peach Liqueur Rectangles baked Filo Pastry each measuring 3.5cm by 6cm 20 gm Icing Sugar 4 scoops Good quality Vanilla Ice Cream Dessert 1 15 Developing Hospitality Talent J adore Yuzu Curd Apricot Yuzu Gel Yuzu Foam Meringue Tuile Crumble Vanilla Jelly Lychee Sorbet Vanilla Jelly 1. Bring all the ingredient to boil except the gelatine. 2. Add soften gelatine and cool down over ice bath stirring occasionally to prevent the vanilla seeds from sinking to the bottom. 3. Set aside in a container when mixture is semi set. Meringue 1. In an electrical mixer with whisk attachment whisk the egg white till fluffy. 2. Add in the sugar a little at a time. Add vanilla extract. When the meringue is stiff remove from machine. 3. Fold in icing sugar. 4. Spread over a suitable stencil and dry in oven at 70 C for at least 3 hrs. 5. Store in air tight container till needed. Apricot Yuzu Gel 2000s - Dessert by Pang Kok Keong 1. Bring apricot puree and yuzu juice to a boil 2. Mix the sugar and pectin thoroughly add this to the above mixture stirring continuously to avoid lumps 3. Remove from heat and add in soften gelatine. 4. Strain and reserve in chiller till needed. Crumble Method 1. Rub all the ingredient together to achieve crumble texture. 2. evenly spread out on a tray lined with baking paper bake at 160 C for approx. 20-30 mins. 3. Reserve in airtight container till needed. Lychee Sorbet 1. Bring the water scraped vanilla pod to a boil 2. Mix thoroughly the sugar glucose powder sorbet stabiliser and add into the above mixture gradually stirring all the time with a whisk to avoid any lumps. 3. Strain the above mixture into the lychee puree and mature for 24 hrs. 4. Churn in a batch freezer and reserve in freezer till needed. Yuzu Curd 1. Over a bain marie warm up the sugar with green lime zest 2. Add in the juice follow by the egg. Cook this till mixture is thicken whisking all the time. 3. Remove from heat add gelatine and cool mixture to 45 C. 4. Using a hand blender blend in cubed butter. 5. Reserve in chiller till needed. Tuile 1. Mix all the ingredients together to form a smooth and homogenous paste. Rest for 2 hrs in fridge. 2. Spread over a suitable stencil and bake at 150 C till evenly browned. 3. Store in airtight container till needed. Yuzu Foam 1. Bring the sugar water green lime zest to a boil add soften gelatine. 2. Add yuzu juice and cool over ice bath. 3. Fill the mixture into a siphon and charge with 1 nitrogen cartridge. Reserve in chiller till needed. Assembly 1. Arrange the components artistically on plate. Garnish with suitable micro herbs. 1 16 Developing Hospitality Talent Ingredients Lychee Sorbet 435 gm 1 2 nos 300 gm 150 gm 12 gm 1500 gm 1 gm 10 130 gm 90 gm 6 gm 1 2 nos Water Vanilla Pod Sugar Glucose Powder Sorbet Stabiliser Lychee Puree Sugar Water Yuzu Juice Gelatine Leaf Green Lime Zest Water Sugar Vanilla Pod Gelatine Apricot Puree Sugar Yellow Pectin Gelatine Yuzu Juice Whole Egg Sugar Yuzu Juice Green Lime Zest Butter Gelatine Egg White Sugar Icing Sugar Vanilla Crumble 100 gm 100 gm 100 gm 100 gm Butter Sugar Flour Ground Almond Melted Butter Flour Icing Sugar Egg White Vanilla Tuile Yuzu Foam 120 gm 120 gm 120 gm 120 gm 1 gm Vanilla Jelly 200 gm 25 gm 1 no 4 gm 1 gm 90 37 gm 2.5 gm 2.5 gm 50 gm Apricot Yuzu Gel Yuzu Curd 4 nos 250 gm 160 gm 2 nos 300 gm 4 gm 200 gm 160 gm 225 gm 1 gm Meringue Dessert 17 1 Developing Hospitality Talent Rouge Sugar Syrup 1. In a medium saucepan combine sugar water the juice of an orange and lemon. 2. Bring to a boil stirring until sugar has dissolved. Allow to cool. Hazelnut Nougatine 1. Preheat the oven to 1 70 C. In a saucepan combine glucose and butter. Bring to a boil over moderate heat. 2. Combine icing sugar and yellow pectin mix well and add into the butter mixture. 3. Continue to boil and stir in the chopped hazelnuts. 4. Spread evenly on a baking tray and bake in preheated oven for 15-20 mins or until golden brown. 5. Let cool completely on a wire rack and break nougatine into small pieces until further use. Raspberry Granite 1. In a saucepan combine all ingredients together and bring to a boil. 2. Sieve the mixture and pour into a container with a lid cover and place in the freezer till needed. Homemade Praline 1. Lightly toast the hazelnuts. Wet the sugar with just enough water and bring to a boil with the scraped vanilla pod. 2. Add the toasted hazelnuts cooked till the sugar is crystallized. Cooked further till it turns caramelised. 3. Turn it out onto a silpat and cool thoroughly. Blend in food processor till a grainy paste is achieved. 2000s - Dessert by Pang Kok Keong Assembly 1. Fill the bottom of the red milk chocolate shell with praline and sprinkle a layer of hazelnut nougatine. 2. Fill with the milk chocolate espuma and top off with raspberry granite to serve. 4. Add fleur de sel. Method Red Milk Chocolate Shell Milk Chocolate Espuma 1. In a saucepan combine milk and cream. Bring to a boil. Mix egg yolk and sugar temper in the hot liquid and cook to 85 C. 2. Sieve the mixture into the finely chopped chocolate and blend with immersion blended chill for at least 6hrs. 3. Pour mixture in an espuma bottle. 4. Add 2 gas cartridges shake and keep refrigerated until needed. 1. Temper and mold 7cm diameter sphere. Join this to a 3cm dia base made of milk chocolate. 2. Using a ring cutter of 4cm heat it with a blow torch and cut the top to form an opening. 3. Place the chocolate sphere in the freezer for at least 3 hrs. 4. Remove from freezer and spray with red cocoa butter. 1 18 Developing Hospitality Talent Ingredients 150 gm 150 gm 30 gm 30 gm 150 gm 125 gm 135 gm 45 gm 45 gm Milk Chocolate Espuma Milk Cream Yolk Sugar Valrhona Jivara Milk Chocolate 40% Raspberry Puree Water Sugar Syrup Lemon Zest Whole Hazelnut (Toasted) Sugar Fleur De Sel Vanilla Pod Valrhona Jivara Milk Chocolate 40% Red Colour Cocoa Butter Glucose Butter Icing Sugar Yellow Pectin Chopped Hazelnui Raspberry Granite Homemade Praline 240 gm 80 gm pinch 2 gm 20 gm 2 gm Red Milk Chocolate Shell Hazelnut Nougatine 1 120 gm 2890 gm 3360 gm 56 gm 3000 gm Dessert 19 1 Developing Hospitality Talent A Glance at the Milestones of SHATEC SHATEC (Singapore Hotel Association Tourism and Education Centre) was established with the aim of providing skilled manpower for Singapore s burgeoning tourism industry in the 1 980s. Established in 1 983 by the Singapore Hotel Association (SHA) with grants from the Singapore Tourism Board (STB) and support from Singapore Development Federation and National Productivity Board SHATEC was officially inaugurated by the late Dr Tay Eng Soon (thenMinister of State for Education). SHATEC expanded in operations and moved from Nassim Hill to Mount Sophia and finally to our current premises at Bukit Batok. In the 1 990s SHATEC began its focus on culinary arts education. Participation in numerous culinary competitions locally and internationally led to an achievement of more than 40 prestigious medals won. SHATEC expanded in curriculum at the start of the new millennium. SHATEC attained CaseTrust for Education for providing good student welfare and exhibiting sound business practices. 1 983 1 992 As the academic reputation of SHATEC grew steadily we gained recognition for our instrumental role in moulding Singapore s manpower development for the tourism sector. In 1 992 we were conferred the Most Outstanding Contribution to Tourism award by Singapore Tourism Board. 1 993-2001 2004 SHATEC attained the Singapore Quality Class for Private Education Organisations (SQC PEO) accreditation for archieving organisational excellence in the private education sector. 2005 20 SHATEC attai as an accredite institution from Office Embassy People s Repub Singapore as w Development A Skills Qualifica organisational 120 Developing Hospitality Talent SHATEC was renamed Shatec Institutes in a rebranding exercise to reflect the new corporate structure and improved curriculum. Shatec Institutes attained the Singapore Quality Class for Private Education Organisations. Shatec Institutes is registered with the Council for Private Education as a Private Education Institution. Shatec Institutes attained the voluntary EduTrust (Provisional) mark for achieving standards in academic processes and educational standards. Shatec Institutes is appointed as a CET Centre for the Tourism and F&B Industries by WDA cementing its position as one of the leading hospitality schools in Singapore. Shatec Institutes renewed her EduTrust (Provisional) certification. 006 2008 2009 Shatec Institutes became the first institution to be inducted into the World Gourmet Summit Hall of Fame for winning the Culinary Institution of the Year award for 4 consecutive years (2001-2004). 2010 201 1 Shatec Institutes renewed her EduTrust (Provisional) certification. 2012 ined certification ed educational m the Education y of the blic of China in well as Workforce Agency Workforce ations (WSQ) l accreditation. 121 Developing Hospitality Talent Bibliography INTERVIEWS Mr Giovanni Angelini Consultant and former CEO Shangri-La Hotels & Resorts Hong Kong Mr Abid Butt CEO Banyan Tree Hotels and Resorts Ms Jennie Chua Mr Chanin Donavanik CEO Dusit Hotels & Resorts Thailand Mr Ricky Goh CEO CARE Hospitality and SHA President (November 1987 to September 1993) Ms Margaret Heng Executive Director of SHA and Chief Executive of SHATEC Mr Ho Kwon Ping Chairman Banyan Tree Hotels and Resorts Mr Patrick Imbardelli CEO Pan Pacific Hotels Group Mr Michael Issenberg COO and Chairman Accor Asia-Pacific Mr Vish Jain Partner and Managing Director Boston Consulting Group Mdm Kay Kuok President of SHA and Executive Chairman of Shangri-La Hotel Singapore Mr Arthur Kiong CEO Far East Hospitality Management Mr Peter Knipp CEO Peter Knipp Holdings Singapore Mr Laurenz Koehler Managing Partner Duxton Consulting Mr Derrick Lee President International Bartenders Association Ms Neeta Lachmandas Board Member of SHATEC and Assistant Chief Executive of the Singapore Tourism Board Business Development Group Mr Loh Lik Peng Founder Director Unlisted Collection and Vice Chairman SHATEC Ms Veera Pardpattanapanich Rector Dusit Thani College Thailand Mr Kurt Rufli former CEO Amari Hotels & Resorts Thailand Mr Pakir Singh former Executive Director of SHA and former CEO SHATEC Mrs Diana Ee-Tan Chairman Academic and Examination Advisory Council SHATEC and SHATEC Board Member Mr Albert Teo CEO Amara Holdings Limited and Chairman of SHATEC Ms Teo Poh Kheam former Deputy Executive Director SHA and former deputy CE SHATEC Mr Otto Weibel Director F&B and Culinary Consultant OTTSCOTT Mr Wong Hong Kuan CEO Singapore Workforce Development Agency (WDA) Manager Conrad Centennial Singapore Mr Ronald Kang General Manager Park Hyatt Beijing China Mr Tony Khoo Executive Chef Marina Mandarin Singapore Mr Arthur Kiong CEO Far East Hospitality Management Singapore Mr Frankson Lee General Manager InterContinental Beijing Financial Street China Ms Jessica Lee Senior Director Corporate Relations McDonald s Singapore Mr Lim Hwee Peng CSW FWS International wine specialist Winecraft Marketing & Services Singapore Ms Jeane Lim General Manager Copthorne King s Hotel Singapore Mr Nicholas Lim President-Asia The Travel Corporation Mr Danny Lingham General Manager Fraser Suites Chengdu China Mr Kellvin Ong Project Director South Beach Hotel & Club Singapore Mr Willie Ong Vice President Ascott Centre for Excellence Singapore Mr Pang Kok Keong Chef Owner Sugar Daddy Group Singapore Mr Pek Chin Siong Executive Director Hotel Operations Marina Bay Sands Singapore Mr Justin Quek Director QBS Dining Concepts and Principal Chef Sky on 57 Marina Bay Sands Singapore Mr Bernard Rodrigues General Manager The Charterhouse Causeway Bay Hong Kong INTERVIEWS SHATEC alumni Mr Nikheel Advani Chief Operating Officer and Principal Grace Bay Resorts Turks & Caicos Islands Ms Monica Alsagoff Senior Vice President Weber Shandwick Singapore Mr Ignatius Chan Founder Iggy s Singapore Mr Richard Chan General Manager DoubleTree Chongqing Wanzhou China Mr Cheong Hai Poh Executive Assistant 122 Developing Hospitality Talent Mr Philip Cyril Raj General Manager Bay Hotel Singapore Mr Eric Teo Culinary Consultant ET Culinary Arts Singapore Mr Edmund Toh Assistant Vice President Culinary Operations Food & Beverage Resorts World Sentosa Singapore and President Singapore Chef Association NEWSPAPERS & MAGAZINES The Straits Times The Business Times TTG Asia SHA Annual Reports 1979-2012 SHA publications Lu Guan Checking In Hotelier BOOKS PAPERS & OTHER ARTICLES - Catering Training Centre Report on project results conclusion and recommendations by the International Labour Organisation Geneva December 1972 Singapore The Expansion of the Hotel & - The hotel industry problems and prospects SHA January 9 1986 - Making Singapore Asia s leading provider of world-class services MTI Report October 14 2002 - McKinsey How the world s most improved school systems keep getting better (November 2010) - Gavin Sanderson Flinders University School of Education International Education Developments in Singapore - The Heritage of Hospitality A History of the Singapore Hotel Industry (2011) ARCHIVES National Archives of Singapore (nas.gov.sg) SHA and SHATEC Archives 123 21 Bukit Batok Street 22 Singapore 659589 Telephone 65 6415 3588 Facsimile 65 6415 3530 Email marcom shatec.sg Website www.shatec.sg